DSE6 + .NET v?

Project Repo: Interoperability Black Box

First steps. Let’s get .NET installed and setup. I’m running Ubuntu 18.04 for this setup and start of project. To install .NET on Ubuntu one needs to go through a multi-command process of keys and some other stuff, fortunately Microsoft’s teams have made this almost easy by providing the commands for the various Linux distributions here. The commands I ran are as follows to get all this initial setup done.

[sourcecode language=”bash”]
wget -qO- https://packages.microsoft.com/keys/microsoft.asc | gpg –dearmor > microsoft.asc.gpg
sudo mv microsoft.asc.gpg /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d/
wget -q https://packages.microsoft.com/config/ubuntu/18.04/prod.list
sudo mv prod.list /etc/apt/sources.list.d/microsoft-prod.list
sudo chown root:root /etc/apt/trusted.gpg.d/microsoft.asc.gpg
sudo chown root:root /etc/apt/sources.list.d/microsoft-prod.list
[/sourcecode]

After all this I could then install the .NET SDK. It’s been so long since I actually installed .NET on anything that I wasn’t sure if I just needed the runtime, the SDK, or what I’d actually need. I just assumed it would be safe to install the SDK and then install the runtime too.

[sourcecode language=”bash”]
sudo apt-get install apt-transport-https
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install dotnet-sdk-2.1
[/sourcecode]

Then the runtime.

[sourcecode language=”bash”]
sudo apt-get install aspnetcore-runtime-2.1
[/sourcecode]

logoAlright. Now with this installed, I wanted to also see if Jetbrains Rider would detect – or at least what would I have to do – to have the IDE detect that .NET is now installed. So I opened up the IDE to see what the results would be. Over the left hand side of the new solution dialog, if anything isn’t installed Rider usually will display a message that X whatever needs installed. But it looked like everything is showing up as installed, “yay for things working (at this point)!

rider-01

Next up is to get a solution started with the pertinent projects for what I want to build.

dse2

Kazam_screenshot_00001

For the next stage I created three projects.

  1. InteroperationalBlackBox – A basic class library that will be used by a console application or whatever other application or service that may need access to the specific business logic or what not.
  2. InteroperationalBlackBox.Tests – An xunit testing project for testing anything that might need some good ole’ testing.
  3. InteroperationalBlackBox.Cli – A console application (CLI) that I’ll use to interact with the class library and add capabilities going forward.

Alright, now that all the basic projects are setup in the solution, I’ll go out and see about the .NET DataStax Enterprise driver. Inside Jetbrains Rider I can right click on a particular project that I want to add or manage dependencies for. I did that and then put “dse” in the search box. The dialog pops up from the bottom of the IDE and you can add it by clicking on the bottom right plus sign in the description box to the right. Once you click the plus sign, once installed, it becomes a little red x.

dse-adding-package

Alright. Now it’s almost time to get some code working. We need ourselves a database first however. I’m going to setup a cluster in Google Cloud Platform (GCP), but feel free to use whatever cluster you’ve got. These instructions will basically be reusable across wherever you’ve got your cluster setup. I wrote up a walk through and instructions for the GCP Marketplace a few weeks ago. I used the same offering to get this example cluster up and running to use. So, now back to getting the first snippets of code working.

Let’s write a test first.

[sourcecode language=”csharp”]
[Fact]
public void ConfirmDatabase_Connects_False()
{
var box = new BlackBox();
Assert.Equal(false, box.ConfirmConnection());
}
[/sourcecode]

In this test, I named the class called BlackBox and am planning to have a parameterless constructor. But as things go tests are very fluid, or ought to be, and I may change it in the next iteration. I’m thinking, at least to get started, that I’ll have a method to test and confirm a connection for the CLI. I’ve named it ConfirmConnection for that purpose. Initially I’m going to test for false, but that’s primarily just to get started. Now, time to implement.

[sourcecode language=”csharp”]
namespace InteroperabilityBlackBox
using System;
using Dse;
using Dse.Auth;

namespace InteroperabilityBlackBox
{
public class BlackBox
{
public BlackBox()
{}

public bool ConfirmConnection()
{
return false;
}
}
}
[/sourcecode]

That gives a passing test and I move forward. For more of the run through of moving from this first step to the finished code session check out this

By the end of the coding session I had a few tests.

[sourcecode language=”csharp”]
using Xunit;

namespace InteroperabilityBlackBox.Tests
{
public class MakingSureItWorksIntegrationTests
{
[Fact]
public void ConfirmDatabase_Connects_False()
{
var box = new BlackBox();
Assert.Equal(false, box.ConfirmConnection());
}

[Fact]
public void ConfirmDatabase_PassedValuesConnects_True()
{
var box = new BlackBox(“cassandra”, “”, “”);
Assert.Equal(false, box.ConfirmConnection());
}

[Fact]
public void ConfirmDatabase_PassedValuesConnects_False()
{
var box = new BlackBox(“cassandra”, “notThePassword”, “”);
Assert.Equal(false, box.ConfirmConnection());
}
}
}
[/sourcecode]

The respective code for connecting to the database cluster, per the walk through I wrote about here, at session end looked like this.

[sourcecode language=”csharp”]
using System;
using Dse;
using Dse.Auth;

namespace InteroperabilityBlackBox
{
public class BlackBox : IBoxConnection
{
public BlackBox(string username, string password, string contactPoint)
{
UserName = username;
Password = password;
ContactPoint = contactPoint;
}

public BlackBox()
{
UserName = “ConfigValueFromSecretsVault”;
Password = “ConfigValueFromSecretsVault”;
ContactPoint = “ConfigValue”;
}

public string ContactPoint { get; set; }
public string UserName { get; set; }
public string Password { get; set; }

public bool ConfirmConnection()
{
IDseCluster cluster = DseCluster.Builder()
.AddContactPoint(ContactPoint)
.WithAuthProvider(new DsePlainTextAuthProvider(UserName, Password))
.Build();

try
{
cluster.Connect();
return true;
}
catch (Exception e)
{
Console.WriteLine(e);
return false;
}

}
}
}
[/sourcecode]

With my interface providing the contract to meet.

[sourcecode language=”csharp”]
namespace InteroperabilityBlackBox
{
public interface IBoxConnection
{
string ContactPoint { get; set; }
string UserName { get; set; }
string Password { get; set; }
bool ConfirmConnection();
}
}
[/sourcecode]

Conclusions & Next Steps

After I wrapped up the session two things stood out that needed fixed for the next session. I’ll be sure to add these as objectives for the next coding session at 3pm PST on Thursday.

  1. The tests really needed to more resiliently confirm the integrations that I was working to prove out. My plan at this point is to add some Docker images that would provide the development integration tests a point to work against. This would alleviate the need for something outside of the actual project in the repository to exist. Removing that fragility.
  2. The application, in its “Black Box”, should do something. For the next session we’ll write up some feature requests we’d want, or maybe someone has some suggestions of functionality they’d like to see implemented in a CLI using .NET Core working against a DataStax Enterprise Cassandra Database Cluster? Feel free to leave a comment or three about a feature, I’ll work on adding it during the next session.

WebStorm JavaScripting & Noding Workflow Webinar Recording

Today the JetBrains team wrapping up final processing for my webinar from last week. You can check out the webinar via their JetBrains Youtube Channel:

JavaScriptFor even more information be sure to check out the questions and answers on the JetBrain WebStorm IDE blog entry. Some of the questions include:

  • Q: How to enable Node.js support in PhpStorm (PyCharm, IntelliJ IDEA, RubyMine)?
  • Q:How to enable autocompletion for Express, Mocha and other libraries?
  • Q: Is it possible to debug a Node.js application that runs remotely? Is it possible to debug when your node and the rest of the dependencies (database, etc.) are running in a VM environment like Vagrant?
  • Q: Does the debugger support cluster mode?

…and others all here.

I’ve Got a JavaScript & Node.js Webinar, Webstorm Tutorial Videos, Work & Flow With JavaScript Development and More…

Webinar: Node.js Development Workflow in WebStorm

This coming week I’m doing an intro to work and flow with Node.js JavaScript Programming that I’m working with JetBrains on. In the webinar I’ll be covering the following key topics in the webinar:

  • Open an existing project & getting WebStorm configured for running, testing and related working tasks.
  • A quick tour of other IDE features that help with daily work. Some in pretty huge ways.
  • Running WebStorm & debugging Node.js JavaScript applications.
  • Checking out Mocha, how it works and what it gives WebStorm the power to do. Then we’ll write a few tests & implement that code too.

All this will include Q & A throughout and at the end of the webinar. Be sure to register soon!

WebStorm Tutorials: Learning Shortcuts, Customizing Layout and Others

These WebStorm Tutorials have been put together by John Lindquist @johnlindquist for JetBrains. There solid, quick snippets of useful WebStorm usage. Two that I’ve found really useful I’ve included here:

John also has a lot of other great totally kick ass material out there. So check out his blog @ http://johnlindquist.com/ and follow his youtube channel too.

Coming Up in the Near Future, The Work & Flow of JavaScript Development

I have a new course I’m working on right now for Pluralsight, that will take these basic precepts and dive even deeper into the daily workflow of the JavaScript Developer. Whether it’s client side hacking or server side coding, I’ll be diving into a whole lot of JavaScript goodness. If you’d like me to ping you when the course is done, hit me up on Twitter @adron and just let me know. In the meantime get a Pluralsight subscription (free to sign up and at least give it a try) and check out these courses by myself and others.

Junction Two Weeks Bi-weekly Review : Issue #004 Tier 3 Pulls Into the Junction

Like any good open source project, a good continuous integration server is fundamental to a smooth workflow for everyone. I’ve always been a big advocate of Team City from JetBrains. With the versatility of the their build server it could be used for Junction and prospectively more in the future as projects started up and expanded. The only issue I ran into immediately was, where can I get some resources to run Team City on?

Immediately I pinged my friend Jared Wray @jaredwray over at Tier 3 to see if there might be some options. He immediately was into the idea, being interested in the Junction Project itself and an advocate of Riak himself it was a perfect fit. Jared ok’d and the Tier 3 team got some access setup to get a Team City build server running for the Junction Project.

I dove into setting up the build server at Tier 3 and as of this moment have a solid green light showing a good build! Thanks to Jared and the Tier 3 team for helping out, we’re all looking forward to slinging some code and getting a nice open source project in Junction.

Over the next few days I’ll also be providing a number of blog entries (the final touches are getting wrapped up right now!) on how I went about setting up Team City, server issues I ran into and the troubleshooting I did to get .NET 4.5 to work specifically for the Junction Application. In the end I’ve gotten a Windows 8 Store Application, using C# building successfully on Team City using NuGet and other key features.

For a quick how-to of setting up Team City check out “TeamCity Setup for Junction Build, Plus Implosions“.

For more information on the Junction Project check out “Windows 8 Logos, Badges, Splash Screens of Riak“, the “Introducing Junction” and “Junction Two Week on Tuesdays Bi-weekly Review : Issues #001“).

Glassfish, Java, JSF and Explorations of IntelliJ IDEA 13

I recently dove into working with some tooling at Jetbrains. The first thing I needed to take a dive into is the latest EAP of IntelliJ IDEA 13. If you do any sort of Java development you’ve definitely heard of IntelliJ, and if you work in other realms like C#, Node.js & JavaScript, Python or other languages you’ve likely heard of other Jetbrains tools like ReSharper, WebStorm or PHPStorm, Pycharm or a host of the other IDEs that they produce. A few ways to describe their product line; solid, quality, useful and kick ass. But I digress, here’s a run down of the look into IntelliJ IDEA 13.

Getting Something to Serve These Pages

Glassfish 4.0 is the latest and greatest of the Glassfish Server. I downloaded and got the server up and running to use as a base to do local development off of. I had installed Glassfish 3.1.2 but realized rapidly that it just wasn’t a good idea. Thus, a piece of advice, stick to Glassfish 4.

When installing Glassfish 4. I ran into a recurring problem, which is obviously recurring far beyond my use. The installer has the error trapped with an intelligent response.

Click for full size image.
Click for full size image.

So thus the Glassfish doesn’t understand where the default installation location is for the JRE. Thus you’ll likely have to help it out and provide it the path via the -j switch. Your path will likely look like this:

[sourcecode language=”bash”]
"C:\Users\you\Downloads\glassfish-4.0-windows.exe" -j "C:\Program Files\Java\jre7"
[/sourcecode]

Once that was taken care of Glassfish 4.0 installed just fine and I was on my way to some sample app building. On to that sample app building shortly, for now let’s talk about configuration of IntelliJ IDEA 13 to work with Glassfish as an application server and the respective bits to get going.

IntelliJ IDEA 13 Configuration

Once you have IntelliJ IDEA 13 open, create a new project.

Welcome Screen for IntelliJ IDEA 13. Click for full size image.
Welcome Screen for IntelliJ IDEA 13. Click for full size image.

Once you click that, pending you’ve already configured IntelliJ IDEA you’ll see a screen display as shown below. If you haven’t configured it already, I’ll go through how to configure things after project creation. That way one can double back and configure the applications you might have already started or pulled from git or something without Glassfish or other servers being setup.

Glassfish and other things, already setup, available for options during project creation. Click for full size image.
Glassfish and other things, already setup, available for options during project creation. Click for full size image.

Note the JavaEE Web Module selection, then set a project name, project location (or leave the default, it’ll fill in when you enter the project name), set the Project SDK. If one isn’t available you’ll need to setup the SDK via the New button. This will bring up a dialog that will allow you to point to the SDK path and IntelliJ will know which version is available. You can do this for additional versions also, but for this example I’ve just installed 1.7 and run with it. Next set the Application server to Glassfish 4.0.0. Next click on Finish, then you’re all set.

When setting up Glassfish a few other options I like to set are shown in the dialog below. This is my default Glassfish setup for Local development. I’ve set the default browser to launch after a build to Chrome. Set the application server to GlassFish 4.0.0. It might seem silly to have this selection on the GlassFish Server dialog, but when there are multiple versions available you may need to setup a different version for different configurations. Next, I often run the server locally without security username and password, so be sure to remove the admin username that is there for the default configuration.

Glassfish Local setup. Click for full size image.
Glassfish Local setup. Click for full size image.

One last thing that I do to myself when setting up JSF, is keep forgetting to add the appropriate option to GlassFish to run JSF Workflow Apps. To run these apps open up the application server configuration for glassfish itself and select the JSF framework library.

Selecting JSF. Click for full size image.
Selecting JSF. Click for full size image.

Now with the application created there is a list of files & libraries.

To the left you can view a number of files & libraries listed. Click for full size image.
To the left you can view a number of files & libraries listed. Click for full size image.

Just to make sure everything is wired up right and the application is able to run, double click on the index.jsp file and add some HTML content. I’ve set up my file like this just to get started.

[sourcecode language=”html”]
<%– Created by IntelliJ IDEA. –%>
<%@ page contentType="text/html;charset=UTF-8" language="java" %>
<html>
<head>
<title>Octo Bear!</title>
</head>
<body>
<h1>Bears!</h1>

<p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Nulla at iaculis eros. Cras eget aliquam mi, ut suscipit
arcu. Suspendisse accumsan auctor tellus in condimentum. Integer interdum a neque eget pharetra. Mauris nec dolor
ipsum. Quisque quis fermentum lorem. Sed tempor egestas dui, sed bibendum justo vulputate eget. Pellentesque tempus
auctor tellus id aliquam. Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. In erat leo, pharetra eget
convallis ut, interdum et eros. Morbi in tortor id tellus tristique aliquet at non urna. Pellentesque habitant morbi
tristique senectus et netus et malesuada fames ac turpis egestas.</p>
</body>
</html>
[/sourcecode]

Now click on the run button in the top right corner of IntelliJ. You might hit this error if you’ve just installed Glassfish and moved straight to creating the project.

Running the new project immediately after installing Glassfish.
Running the new project immediately after installing Glassfish.

Open up a browser and navigate to http://localhost:4848/ to bring up the administration page for Glassfish 4.0.

Glassfish 4.0 Administration site. (click for full size image)
Glassfish 4.0 Administration site. (click for full size image)

Click on the server (Admin server) section that’s pointed to in the image above. A page will display that has a button to stop the Glassfish server. Click on stop and that will enable IntelliJ to take over and run the server instead. You’ll want IntelliJ to do this as it will manage the restart, redeploy, update of classes and resources during coding & running the web application. This is much easier than attempting to attach or otherwise manage the server during development.

That’s just a few of the tips and tricks to getting started with the latest IntelliJ IDEA 13 EAP IDE for Java. In my next article I’m going to dive into a few of IntelliJ IDEA 13’s newest features for JSF Workflow Faces Applications.