Development Machine Environment Build & Language Stack Installations – Browsers & IDE’s

In this video I put together some basic IDE’s and browsers I install. In the case of browsers that includes more than a few. For the case of IDE’s it’s my standard arsenal of Jetbrains IDE’s and Visual Studio Code. For the previous step in this series, check out the Base OS Load post.

Additional Notes

Here’s the full list of IDE’s I installed.

IDEs

Browsers

That’s it for now. However, if you’re interested in joining me for next steps, language stack setup, and more in addition to writing some JavaScript, Go, Python, Terraform, and more infrastructure, web dev, and all sorts of coding I stream regularly on Twitch at https://twitch.tv/adronhall, post the VOD’s to YouTube along with entirely new tech and metal content at https://youtube.com/c/ThrashingCode. Feel free to check out a coding session, ask questions, interject, or just come and enjoy the tunes!

For more blogging, I’ve write on https://compositecode.blog and the Thrashing Code Newsletter for more details about open source projects and related efforts I work on, sign up for it here!

Hi, I’m Adron & This is My Gear Setup

I sat down and made a short video of my systems setup and related gear. I’ve always enjoyed seeing other peoples’ setups so figured I’d join the mix and show you all what I work with. Happy to answer any questions too, cheers!

In addition to the video intro I’ve created some additional repositories and related things that I use frequently that may be useful.

Ubuntu Dev Setup Repository: This repo dev-setup-ubuntu has some installation scripts and related collateral that I use to get virtual machines built in an automated way. The focus of this is for setting up development boxes and not for setting up servers.

Video Stream Hacking AKA Twitch & Youtube Live Streaming: This repo is setup with notes and eventually I’ll likely add scripts and related collateral that I use during filming Twitch/Youtube Streams.

Full Gear List: If you’re interested in what makes this possible, at a more detailed level, this is the list to check out.

IDE Launcher via Amtrak Cascades to Portland for ML4ALL

Got fidgety on the train, and just wanted to write code, on the way down to Portland for ML4ALL so I wrote up some decision tree code on determining what IDE’s I want opened up. Ya know, if you do something more than twice it needs automated, so I’ve started the process of automating all startup and shutdown tasks for a day’s coding. Simplistic geeky train geek code fun code is fun geeky train code. Cheers!

[sourcecode language=”cpp”]
package main

import (
“time”
“fmt”
)

var sessionMinimal, sessionMedium, sessionLong, sessionZone time.Duration
var language string

func main() {
sessionMinimal = 15
sessionMedium = 45
sessionLong = 90
sessionZone = 180

language = “golang”

openIde(“golang”, 200)
}

func openIde(languageStack string, expectedCodingTime time.Duration) {
var ide string

switch {
case expectedCodingTime sessionZone:
ide = stackSpecific(languageStack, false, true, true)
fmt.Printf(“Launching: %s”, ide)

}
}

func stackSpecific(language string, fastLaunch bool, featureRich bool, introspective bool) string {
if fastLaunch == true && featureRich == true && introspective == true {
return “\n\nCome on, you know better. You get at best two out of three.\n\n”
}

if fastLaunch == true && featureRich == true {
return “Visual Studio Code”
}

if featureRich == true && introspective == true {
switch language {
case “SQL”:
return “DataGrip”
case “C”:
return “CLion”
case “Python”:
return “PyCharm”
case “golang”:
return “Goland”
case “java”:
return “IntelliJ”
case “scala”:
return “IntelliJ”
case “kotlin”:
return “IntelliJ”
case “dotnet”:
return “Rider”
case “csharp”:
return “Rider”
case “fsharp”:
return “Rider”
case “vbnet”:
return “Rider”
case “javascript”:
return “Webstorm”
case “hcl”:
return “IntelliJ”
case “ruby”:
return “RubyMine”
case “swift”:
return “AppCode”
case “obj-c”:
return “AppCode”
default:
return “IntelliJ”
}
}

if featureRich == true {
switch language {
case “swift”:
return “AppCode”
case “obj-c”:
return “AppCode”
default:
return “Visual Studio Code”
}
}

if introspective == true {
switch language {
case “swift”:
return “AppCode”
case “obj-c”:
return “AppCode”
default:
return “Visual Studio Code”
}
}

if fastLaunch == true {
return “Sublime”
}

return “No IDE for you.”
}
[/sourcecode]

WebStorm JavaScripting & Noding Workflow Webinar Recording

Today the JetBrains team wrapping up final processing for my webinar from last week. You can check out the webinar via their JetBrains Youtube Channel:

JavaScriptFor even more information be sure to check out the questions and answers on the JetBrain WebStorm IDE blog entry. Some of the questions include:

  • Q: How to enable Node.js support in PhpStorm (PyCharm, IntelliJ IDEA, RubyMine)?
  • Q:How to enable autocompletion for Express, Mocha and other libraries?
  • Q: Is it possible to debug a Node.js application that runs remotely? Is it possible to debug when your node and the rest of the dependencies (database, etc.) are running in a VM environment like Vagrant?
  • Q: Does the debugger support cluster mode?

…and others all here.

Deploy a Framework Friday #4 Some Node.js .gitignore Cloud 9 IDE Sharing toward Cloud Foundry / Iron Foundry Deployment

Today’s “Deploy a Framework Friday” is a little bit of a diversion. Today Richard (@rseroter) and I dove into Cloud9IDE (@Cloud9IDE) to try out some pair programming with the online IDE sharing. We made some minor progress with Matt (@matt_pardee) & Eric (@ang3lfir3) jumping in for a few minutes. The intent of this effort was to pull together a little code to deploy, as Richard wrote about a few months ago in the article “Deploying Node.js Applications to Iron Foundry using the Cloude9 IDE“.

Here’s a video of us all fumbling through attempting to get the .gitignore file setup.

Richard Seroter (@rseroter) and I (@adron) took a stab at sharing some code, with the attempt to do some pair programming. We made a little progress, and even had some people join us live via Twitter and edit some of the code with us. For a short play by play, check out the blog entry here: http://compositecode.com/2012/08/03/deploy-a-frame…dry-deployment/

Questions:

  1. Why did the .gitignore not show up on Richard’s Screen?
  2. What were the intermittent errors that came up?
  3. Why did it say I was setup for “premium” but I couldn’t use express?
  4. Is it supposed to be that the other person can’t make changes while someone is chatting?

I’m not sure what happened (anyone at Cloud 9 IDE know what happened) when the .gitignore totally disappeared  but in the video you can see that I committed and pushed the .gitignore file. I had to recreate it to get anything to show up, and initially it didn’t seem to share either. I’m not sure how that is supposed to work, but am assuming something wasn’t setup correctly in the first place.

As for express I’ll be giving that a try a little bit later.

Next Steps Toward Deployment

Over the next few weeks or so, Richard and I will be going back and forth building a Node.js based web application for deployment from Cloud 9 IDE to our Iron Foundry Environment. Overall, this will be a slightly drawn out “Deploy a Framework Friday“, with its own sub-parts to the series.

We’ll culminate the project in an open source project that will be available on Github and also with a summary on the Iron Foundry Blog. In one of our pending blog entries we’ll draw up the architecture of the application we’ll be building out. So stay tuned!

NOTE: Working in conjunction with these other bloggers / blogs: