Tag Archives: How-to

Oh, exFAT Doesn’t Work on Linux

But to the rescue comes the search engine. I found some material on the matter and, as I’ve learned frequently, don’t count out Linux when it comes to support of nearly everything on Earth. Sure enough, there’s support for exFAT (really, why wouldn’t there be?)

Check out this repo: https://github.com/relan/exfat

There’s of course the git clone and make and make install path or there’s also the apt install path.

git clone https://github.com/relan/exfat.git
cd exfat
autoreconf --install
./configure
make

Then make install.

make install

Of course, as with things on Linux, no reboot needed just use it now to mount a drive.

mount.exfat-fuse /dev/spec /mnt/exfat

To note, if you’re using Ubuntu 18.04 the support will just be available now so re-click on the attached drive or memory device you’ve just attached and it will now appear. Pretty sweet. If you want to use apt just run this command.

apt install exfat-fuse

That’s it. Now you’ve

Cassandra / DataStax Enterprise 6 Clusters: Marketplace Options

As I have stepped full speed into work and research at DataStax there were a few things I needed as soon as I could possibly get them put together. Before even diving into development, use case examples, or reference application development I needed to have some clusters built up. The Docker image is great for some simple local development, but beyond that I wanted to have some live 3+ node clusters to work with. The specific deployed and configured use cases I had included:

  1. I wanted to have a DataStax Enterprise 6 Cassandra Cluster up and running ASAP. A cluster that would be long lived that I could developer sample applications against, use for testing purposes, and generally develop against from a Cassandra and DSE purpose.
  2. I wanted to have an easy to use cluster setup for Cassandra – just the OSS deployment – possibly coded and configured for deployment with Terraform and related scripts necessary to get a 3 node cluster up and running in Google Cloud Platform, Azure, or AWS.
  3. I wanted a DataStax Enterprise 6 enabled deployment, that would showcase some of the excellent tooling DataStax has built around the database itself.

I immediately set out to build solutions for these three requirements.

The first cluster system I decided to aim for was figuring out a way to get some reasonably priced hardware to actually build a physical cluster. Something that would make it absurdly easy to just have something to work with anytime I want without incurring additional expenses. Kind of the ultimate local development environment. With that I began scouring the interwebs and checking out where or how I could get some boxes to build this cluster with. I also reached out to a few people to see if I could be gifted some boxes from Dell or another manufacturer.

I lucked out and found some cheap boxes someone was willing to send over my way for almost nothing. But in the meantime since shipping will take a week or two. I began scouring the easy to get started options on AWS, Google Cloud Platform, and Azure. Continue reading