Tag Archives: distributed database

TRIP REPORT: Accelerate 2019 in Washington DC, I mean National Harbor!

Trip Time.

Today’s trip care of Alaska Airlines Flight 2 out of SEATAC Airport (Seattle & Tacoma’s airport) to National (Reagan) in Alexandria, Virginia. I’ll be staying there and commuting daily across the Potomoc River to Gaylord Resort and Convention Center (at National Harbor). I decided I’d write up something about this trip for a few specific reasons:

  1. I finally purchased a Bromptown Bicycle which I’ve been wanting to attain and use for my trips that require air travel or don’t have enough space for a proper bicycle.
  2. The adventure is entirely new to me, I’ve not been to these locations at any point in my life. New for me, new for those reading this (or adventuring along with me on my Twitch channel).
  3. I also picked up a number of new things that I want to see how they’ll work for streaming while on the go. These include; Android Phone, a new dual Go Pro + Phone mount for the bike, and among these a few existing devices like my trusty set of GoPro Cameras.
  4. I flew over via first class for various reasons. I thus, wanted to share some of the advantages and why I think it’s more than worth it to fly first class vs. coach and why companies should rethink their ideas around this when positions require frequent travel and working on the go.

Leaving Cascadia

The first thing I did was pack up the Brompton. I got a hardshell case to go along with it since I’d read during my research the airlines sometimes will snap off parts of the bike when a softshell case is used. The other advantage, the hardshell case has wheels! Inside this I also put my front mount messenger bag and some bungie cables so I can mount this stuff up to the bike upon arrival.

Once that was packed it was time to get the Mission Workshop ARKIV backpack I have locked and loaded. In my pack, which is the large of the two sizes, I get all my cloths, toothbrush, razors, and related amenities. In the side pouches that I mount up specific for longer trips I put my power brick and other electric plugs I’d need regularly in the quickest to access pouches. The other things go in various assorted pockets here and there. Since this is such a short trip, I also skip the outer backpack laptop pouch and just put the laptop in the inner sleeve.

Stats

Backpack w/ Laptop: 22 lbs. (with laptop)
Hardshell w/ Bike: 32 lbs.

All in all, a fairly heavy load, but the cool thing is with the configuration and post-arrival setup I have there isn’t actually much to carry. Backpack goes on my back and the hardshell case rolls along like a carry on. What makes it even easier, I’ve got an express bus with plenty of space and light rail with special areas specific for luggage like this. My 17x Express arrives on time, I board and ride off with my pack and hard shell sitting right next to me.

When I arrive downtown I merely pack up and roll downstairs to the Sound Transit LINK, board the train and off to the airport I go. No need to mess with a driver, no need for chatter or worrying about the implications of social anxiety or evils of clicking “don’t talk to me uber driver”. Just board and go. Then, read a book, check your phone, or whatever comes to mind. That’s what I do.

At the airport I strolled and rolled into the first class lounge, which I attempted to record via my new Android with the Twitch app. It… went oddly I’m assuming. Let’s take a look here.

Once I got situated in the lounge I made some pancakes – a tradition I have now – and sat down for some coding. The seats are comfortable, the views are great, and along with the coding I get to nerd out on all the planes taking on and off. At least, when one is flying in and out of C Gate at SEATAC. N Gates are kind of “meh”.

Eventually I left the relaxing lounge and headed into the boarding area of C Gates. The Alaska Air 737-900 arrived and started deplaning. With deplaning, boarding, and refueling done for the trip back east to DC we headed back out on the tarmac to queue up 15th in line to take off. Check that out, total plane traffic jam!

IMG_20190520_140122

Once in the air we flew through some piddly turbulence and into more clouds. Clearing 10,000 foot laptops came out and a little bit more coding resumed. In addition I started this post, took a few pictures, and knocked out a few other things I needed to do.

After a while food and drink services began. In first class anything over an hour can safely assume a meal will be served. This time it was tortellini or a sandwich of some sort. I got the tortellini. The meal is then served in three parts. Starting with a little salad and soup, entree, and then wrapped up with a desert.

The soup was tasty, I was somewhat surprised by this. Where as the salad was merely a salad with some cherry tomatoes, carrots, and greens. Nothing real special, but then of course it’s a salad so not like there’s much expectation.

The tortellini was pretty good. Even in comparison to other food outside of the airlines. A little salt and pepper brought it up just slightly to something I’d even have been happy with in an actual restaurant!

Finally we wrapped up with some Salt & Straw for desert. Considering this is an airplane I was kind of amazed they’d get Salt & Straw, but then again, Alaska Airlines does like to play to the local products and all!

After food, a couple more hours of coding and prep for the oncoming days of Accelerate.

Arrival in the District of Columbia

I arrived in DC, retrieved my Brompton and racked up the case it packs in and threw my bag on the front. Now for a 26 minute bike ride from the airport to Alexandria.

the-path.png

On the way, the setting was magnificent with honey suckle providing a divine fragrance while I road along the bike trail along the Potomac River. The moon shined down, almost full, and in spectacular fashion!

Eventually I arrived at my new home for the week. The ride a success, an experiment that it was.

Bootcamp!

NOTE: I am an employee at DataStax, just so you know, in case you didn’t know. I always do my best to give you the direct details, but just so you don’t think I’m being a shill here. Some people don’t seem to be able to determine how people and occupations are correlated, so I like to keep things on the up and up.

First day, or maybe it’s zero day on account of zero based indexes and all, bootcamp kicked off!

In the boot camp we covered a lot of material to get attendees up to speed on Apache Cassandra. To boot, Patrick McFadin announced that everybody would get to use DataStax Constellation, our new Cassandra as a Service offering – currently in test. The awesomeness about this whole bootcamp was that we provided Constellation for everybody, without a blip on the radar! No system issues came up, albeit we crossed a few programmatic network wires that were crisscrossed but that got remedied in seconds. With that all wrapped up, released, with a bow on top, bootcamp went off without a hitch. Also a huge shout out to the dozens of team members that provided support throughout the room of 300+ attendees!

Good times in success!

Day 1 – Announcing DataStax Constellation

The first day, based on our zero based index numbering of conference days, started with Billy Bosworth CEO of DataStax giving keynote number one.

In the keynote Billy talks about the direction of DataStax and the upcoming releases, and current releases as of Accelerate 2019. Then Chelsea Navo joins Billy to do a LIVE – emphasis on a LIVE demo of DataStax Enterprise (i.e. Apache Cassandra and all the goodies) running multi-cloud in Azure, AWS, and GCP.

9:23 – Demo of DataStax Enterprise – Multi-cloud in real life. “Not a pretend demo!

15:17 – Chealsea shows how we introduced a little chaos into the mix, and introduces the ability to simply and easily bring a datacenter down. In realtime, as the related reads and writes are occurring. Nothing stops, not even a blip… whoops, did I spoil it? Give it a watch, it’s a solid keynote demo!

At the 20 minute mark, Billy introduced DataStax Constellation. Watch it, learn more, etc. Following that Billy talks about Insights, which will be built in and services based AI, system health, and related capabilities within the cloud offering.

After the keynote, everybody broke out into technical sessions on a wide, very wide range of topics. From Apache Cassandra to DataStax to Kafka to Vue.js! Great day!

Day 2 – Apache Cassandra v4.0

On day two Billy starts off the keynotes, and introduces others including Nate McCall. Nate is the Apache Cassandra PMC Chair & committer to the project. He dove into the new features, capabilities, and changes of v4.

Next up is DataStax CTO (and founder!) and Apache Cassandra committer of yore, and more, Jonothan Ellis! (video is time point linked below so you can dive right into the talk).

After the keynotes more technical sessions. I attended some architecture discussions around graph and related technology. Lots of good conversations. I really enjoyed it, and to wrap it all up that evening we had an ending keynote with Keren Elazari.

Departure

I had a great time, and as I always like a little lagniappe. Here’s some photos from the trip back. If you’d like to join DataStax Accelerate for 2020, give a good look at the upcoming conference next year!

 

DataStax Developer Days

Over the last week I had the privilege and adventure of coming out to Chicago and Dallas to teach about operations and security capabilities of DataStax Enterprise. More about that later in this post, first I’ll elaborate on and answer the following:

  • What is DataStax Developer Day? Why would you want to attend?
  • Where are the current DataStax Developer Day events that have been held, and were future events are going to be held?
  • Possibilities for future events near a city you live in.

What is DataStax Developer Day?

The way we’ve organized this developer day event at DataStax, is focused around the DataStax Enterprise built on Apache Cassandra product, however I have to add the very important note that this isn’t merely just a product pitch type of thing, you can and will learn about distributed databases and systems in a general sense too. We talk about a number of the core principles behind distributed systems such as the pivotally important consistent hash ring, datacenter and racks, gossip, replication, snitches, and more. We feel it’s important that there’s enough theory that comes along with the configuration and features covered to understand who, what, where, why, and how behind the configuration and features too.

The starting point of the day’s course material is based on the idea that one has not worked with or played with a Apache Cassandra or DataStax Enterprise. However we have a number of courses throughout the day that delve into more specific details and advanced topics. There are three specific tracks:

  1. Cassandra Track – this track consists of three workshops: Core Cassandra, Cassandra Data Modeling, and Cassandra Application Development. [more details]
  2. DSE Track – this track consists of three workshops: DataStax Enterprise Search, DataStax Enterprise Analytics, and DataStax Enterprise Graph. [more details]
  3. Bonus Content – This track has two workshops: DataStax Enterprise Overview and DataStax Enterprise Operations and Security.  [more details]

Why would you want to attend?

  • One huge rad awesome reason is that the developer day events are FREE. But really, nothing is ever free right? You’d want to take a day away from the office to join us, so there’s that.
  • You also might want to even stay a little later after the event as we always have a solidly enjoyable happy hour so we can all extend conversations into the evening and talk shop. After all, working with distributed databases, managing data, and all that jazz is honestly pretty enjoyable when you’ve got awesome systems like this to work with, so an extended conversation into the evening is more than worth it!
  • You’ll get a firm basis of knowledge and skillset around the use, management, and more than a few ideas about how Apache Cassandra and DataStax Enterprise can extend your system’s systemic capabilities.
  • You’ll get a chance to go beyond merely the distributed database system of Apache Cassandra itself and delve into graph, what it is and how it works, analytics, and search too. All workshops take a look at the architecture, uses, and what these capabilities will provide your systems.
  • You’ll also have one on one time with DataStax engineers, and other technical members of the team to ask questions, talk about architecture and solutions that you may be working on, or generally discuss any number of graph, analytics, search, or distributed systems related questions.

Where are the current DataStax Developer Day events that have been held, and were future events are going to be held? So far we’ve held events in New York City, Washington DC, Chicago, and Dallas. We’ve got two more events scheduled with one in London, England and one in Paris, France.

Future events? With a number of events completed and a few on the calendar, we’re interested in hearing about future possible locations for events. Where are you located and where might an event of this sort be useful for the community? I can think of a number of cities, but organizing them into order to know where to get something scheduled next is difficult, which is why the team is looking for input. So ping me via @Adron, email, or just send me a quick message from here.

A New Adventure of Multi-model Distribute Graph Time Series […etc…] Database(s) Explorations Begins!

I arrived at the airport, sending a few tweets of this or that nature with all of this Github and Microsoft News. I have a great view out the window from the Alaska Lounge just before heading to the D gates. For you aeronautics fans like myself, here’s a picture of that view and a few of those Alaska Planes with one of the newly acquired Virgin America Planes!

IMG_5264

All this news with Github and Microsoft was easily eclipsing WWDC18 and in the meanwhile little ole’ me is on my way to a new adventure in my career. So priorities what they are, the news being excited, I’m more excited today to announce today I’m joining a most excellent team at DataStax! to bring forth investigation, research, knowledge, ideas, and whatever else I can as a Developer Evangelist with the crew here at DataStax! I’m unbelievably stoked as I’ve been searching for a company that would check all of my “will this work” check boxes for some months now! DataStax won out among the other prospective candidate companies and I’m starting today!

datastax_logo_blue

To kick off this adventure, I’m heading to San Francisco to join in the fun attending DevxCon. I’ll be there a little later today, hopefully in time for the kick off (ya know, pending flights and BART are all timely and such)! Then a full day of the conf, then later will join the team for a visit to DataStax HQ and maybe a few surprises. I’m super excited and ready to bring awesome content your way, while inventing, building, and experimenting my way through some awesome technologies!

Truly Excellent People and Coding Inspiration…

.NET Fringe took place this last week. It’s been a rather long time since my last actual conference that I actually got to really attend, meet people, and talk to people about all the different projects, aspirations, goals, and ideas about what’s next for the future. This conference was perfect to jump into, first and foremost, I knew it was an effort in being inclusive of the existing community and newcomers. We’d reached out to many brave souls to come and attend this conference about pushing technology into the future.

I met some truly excellent people. Smart, focused, intent, and a whole lot of great conversations followed meeting these people. Here’s a few people you’ll want to keep an eye on based on the technology they’re working on. I got to sit down and talk to every one of these coders and they’re in top form, smart, inventive, witty and full of great humor to boot!

Maria Naggaga @Twitter

I met Maria and one of the first things I saw was her crafty and most excellent art sketches around lifestyles, heroes, and more. I love art like this, and was really impressed with what Maria had done with her’s.

Maria giving us the info.

Maria giving us the info.

I was able to hang out with Maria a bit more and had some good conversation time talking about evangelism, tech fun and nonsense all around. I also was able to attend her talk on “Legacy… What?” which was excellent. The question she posed in the description states a common question posed, “When students think about .Net they think: legacy , enterprise , retired, and what is that?” which I too find to be a valid thought. Is .NET purely legacy these days? For many getting into the field it generally isn’ the landscape of greenfield applications and is far more commonly associated with legacy applications. Hearing her vantage point on this as an evangelist was eye opening. I gained more ideas, thoughts, and was pushed to really get that question answered for students in a different way…  which I’ll add to sometime in the future in another blog entry.

Kathleen Dollard @Twitter && @Github

I spoke to Kathleen while we took a break across the street from the conference at Grendal’s Coffee Shop. We talked a lot about education and what is effective training, diving heavily into what works around video, samples, and related things. You see, we’re both authors at Pluralsight too and spend a lot of time thinking about these things. It was great to be able to sit down and really discuss these topics face to face.

We also dived into a discussion about city livability and how Portland’s transit system works, what is and isn’t working in the city and what it’s like to live here. I was, of course, more than happy to provide as much information as I could.

We also discussed her interest in taking legacy shops (i.e. pre-C# even, maybe Delphi or whatever might exist) and helping them modernize their shop. I found this interesting, as it could be a lot of fun figuring out large gaps in technology like that and helping a company to step forward into the future.

Kathleen gave two presentations at the conference – excellent presentations. One was the “Your Code, Your Brain” presentation, talking about exactly the topic of legacy shops moving forward without disruption.

If you’re interested in Kathleen’s courses, give a look here.

Amy Palamountain @Twitter && @Github

Amy had a wicked great slides and samples that were probably the most flawless I’ve seen in a while. Matter of fact, a short while after the conference Amy put together a blog entry about those great slides and samples “Super Smooth Technical Demoes“.

An intent and listening audience.

An intent and listening audience.

An intent and listening audience.Amy’s talked at the conference was titled “Space, Time, and State“. It almost sounds like we could just turn that into an acronym. The talk was great, touched on the aspects of reactiveness and the battle of state that we developers fight every day while building solutions.

We also got to talk a little after the presentation, the horror of times zones, and a slew of good conversation.

Tomasz Janczuk @Twitter && @Github

AAAAAaggghhhhhh! I missed half of Tomasz’s talk! It always happens at every conference right! You get to talking to people, excited about this topic or that topic and BOOM, you’ve missed half of a talk that you fully intended to attend. But hey, the good part is I still got to see half the talk!

If you’re not familiar with Tomasz’ work and you do anything with Node.js you should pay close attention. Tomasz has been largely responsible for the great work behind Edge.js and influencing the effort to get Node.js running (and running damn well might I add) on Windows. For more on Edge.js check out Act I and Act II and the Github repository.

The Big Hit for Me, Distributed Systems

First some context. About 4 years ago I left the .NET Community almost entirely. Even though I was still doing a little work with C# I primarily switched stacks to other things to push forward with Riak, distributed systems usage, devops deployment of client apps, and a whole host of other things. At the time I basically had gotten real burned out on where the .NET Community had ended up worldwide, while some pushed onward with the technologies I loved to work with, I was tired of waiting and dived into some esoteric stuff and learned strange programming techniques in JavaScript, Ruby, Erlang and dived deeper into distributed technologies for use in application construction.

However some in the community didn’t stop moving the ball forward, and at this conference I got a great view into some of that progress! I’m stoked to see this technology and where it is now, because there is a LOT of potential for a number of things. Here’s the two talks and two more great people I got to see speak. One I knew already (great to see you again and hang out Aaron!) and one I had the privilege & honor to meet (it was most excellent hanging out and seeing your presentation Lena).

Aaron Stonnard @Twitter && @Github

Aaron I’d met back when Troy & I put together the first Node PDX. Aaron had swung into Portland to present on “Building Node.js Applications on Windows Azure“. At .NET Fringe however Aaron was diving into a topic that was super exciting to me. The first line of the description from the topic really says it all “Distributed computing in .NET isn’t something you often hear about, but it’s becoming an increasingly important area for growing .NET businesses around the globe. And frankly it’s an area where .NET has lagged behind other runtimes and platforms for years – but this is changing!“. Yup, that’s my exact pain point, it’s awesome to know Aaron & Petabridge are kicking ass in this space now.

Aaron’s presentation was solid, as to be expected. We also had some good conversations after and before the presentation about the state of distributed compute and systems within the Microsoft and Windows ecosystem. To check out more about Akka .NET that Aaron & Andrew Skotzko …  follow @AkkaDotNet, @aaronontheweb, @petabridge, and @askotzko.

Akka .NET

Alena Dzenisenka @Twitter && @Github

...

…Lena traveled all the way from Kiev in the Ukraine to provide the .NET Fringe crowd with some serious F# distributed and parallel compute knowledge in “Embracing the Cloud“!  (Slides here)

Here’s a short dive into F# here if you’re unfamiliar, which you can install on OS-X, Windows or whatever. So don’t use the “well, I don’t use windows” excuse to not give it a try! Here’s info about MBrace that  Lena also used in her demo. Also dive into brisk from elastacloud…

In addition to the excellent talk that Lena gave I also got to hang out with her, Phil Haack, Ryan Riley, and others over food at Biwa on the last day of the conference. After speaking with Lena about the Ukraine, computing, coding and other topics around hacking and the OSS Community she really inspired me to take a dive into these tools for some of the work that I’m working on now and what I’ll be doing in the near future.

All The Things

Now of course, there were a ton of other people I got to meet, people I got to catch up with I haven’t seen in ages and others I didn’t get to write about. It was a really great conference with great content. I’m looking forward to round 2 and spending more time with everybody in the future!

The whole bunch of us at the end of the conference!

The whole bunch of us at the end of the conference!

Cheers everybody!   \m/

An Aside of Blog Entries on .NET Fringe

Here are some additional blog entries that others wrote about the event. In addition to these blog entries I’ll be updating this entry with any additional entries that I see pop up – so if you post one let me know, and I’ll also update these talks above that I’ve discussed with videos when they’re posted live.

JavaScript

History of Symphonize.js – JavaScript Client Pivot to Data Generation Library

…the history of symphonize.js So Far!

NOTE: If you just want to check out the code bits, scroll down to the sub-title #symphonize #hacking. Also important to note I’m putting the library through a fairly big refactor at the moment so that everything aligns with the documentation that I’ve recently created. So many things may not be implemented, but we’re moving toward v0.1.0, which will be a functional implementation of the library available via npm based entirely on the documentation and specs that I outline after the history.

A Short History

I started the symphonize.js project back on the 1st of November. Originally I started the project as a client driver library for Orchestrate.io, but within a day Chris Molozian commented and pointed out that there was already a client driver library for Orchestrate.io available that Steve Kaliski (Github @sjkaliski and Twitter @stevekaliski and http://stevekaliski.com/) had coded called logically orchestrate.js. Since this was available I did a pivot to symphonize.js being a data generation project instead.

The comment that enabled symphonize.js to pivot from client driver to data generation library.

The comment that made me realize symphonize.js should pivot from client driver to data generation library.

The Official Start of Symphonize.js

After that start and quick pivot I posted a blog with Orchestrate.io titled “Test Data Builder Symphonize.js With Chance.js (1/3)” to officially start the project. In that post I covered key value and graph basics, with a dive into using chance.js and orchestrate.js with examples. Near the same time I also posted a related blog on publishing an NPM module, which is the deployment focus of Symphonize.js.

Reasons Reasoning

There are two main reasons why I chose Orchestrate.io and a data generation library as the two things I wanted to combine. The first, is I knew the orchestrate.io team and really dug what they were building. I wanted to work with it and check out how well it would work for my use cases in the future. The ability to go sit down, discuss with them what they were building was great (which I interviewed Matt Heitzenroder @roder that you can watch Orchestrate.io, Stop Dealing With the Database Infrastructure!) The second reason is that my own startup that I’m co-founding with Aaron Gray (@agray) needed to use key value and graph data storage of some type, somewhere. Orchestrate.io looked like a perfect fit. After some research, giving it a go, it fit very well into what we are building.

CRUD, cURL Hacking & Next Steps

Early December I knocked out two support articles about testing APIs with cURL in Some JavaScript API Coding With Restify & Express & Hacking it With cURL …Segment #1 (with some Webstorm to boot) and Some JavaScript API Coding With Restify & Express & Hacking it With cURL …Segment #2 and an article on the Orchestrate.io Blog for part 2 of that series titled Symphonize Some Create, Read, Update & Delete [CRUD] via Orchestrate.js (2/3).

December then rolled into the standard holiday doldrums and slowdowns. So fast forward to January post a few rounds of beer and good tidings and I got the 3rd in the series published titled Getting Serious With Symphony.js – JavaScript TDD/BDD Coding Practices (3/3). The post doesn’t speak too much to symphony.js usage but instead my efforts to use TDD or BDD practices in trying to write the library.

Slowly I made progress in building the library and finally it’s in a mostly releasable state now. I use this library daily in working with the code base for Deconstructed and imagine I’ll use it ongoing for many other projects. I hope others might be able to find uses for it too and maybe even add capabilities or ideas. Just ping me via Twitter @adron or Github @adron, add an issue on Github and I’ll be happy to accept pull requests for new features, code refactoring, add you to the project or whatever else you’re interested in.

#symphonize #hacking

Now for the nitty gritty. If you’re up for using or contributing to the project check out the symphonize.js github pages site first. It’s got all the information to help get you kick started. However, you can keep reading as I’ve included much of the information there along with the examples from the README.md below.

NOTE: As I mentioned at the top of this blog entry, the funcitonal implementation of code isn’t available via npm just yet, myself and some others are ripping through a good refactor to align the implementation fo the library with the rewritten and newly available documentation – included blow and at the github pages.

How to use this project in one of your projects.

npm install symphonize

How to setup this project for development.

First fork the repository located at https://github.com/Adron/symphonize.

git clone git@github.com:YourUserName/symphonize.git
cd symphonize
npm install

Using The Library

The intended usage is to invocate the JavaScript object and then call generate. That’s it, a super simple process. The code would look like this:

var Symphonize = require('../bin/symphonize');
var symphonize = new Symphonize();

The basic constructor invocation like this utilizes the generate.json file to generate data from. To inject the json configuration programmatically just inject the json configuration information via the constructor.

var configJson = {"schema":"keyvalue"};

var Symphonize = require('../bin/symphonize');
var symphonize = new Symphonize();

Once the Symphonize data generator has been created call the generate() method as shown.

symphonize.generate();

That’s basically it. But you say, it’s supposed to do X, Y or Z. Well that’s where the json configuration data comes into play. In the configuration data you can set the data fields and what they’ll generate, what type of data will be generated, the specific schema, how many records to create and more.

generate.json

The library comes with the generate.json file already setup with a working example. Currently the generation file looks like this:

{
    "schema": "keyvalue", /* keyvalue, graph, event, geo */
        "count": 20, /* X values to generate. */
    "write_source": "console", /* console, orchestrateio and whatever other data sources that might come up. */
    "fields": {
            /* generates a random name. */
            "fieldName": "name",
            /* generates a random dice roll of a d20. */
            "fieldTwo": "d20",
            /* A single lorum ipsum random statement is genereated. */
            "fieldSentence": "sentence",
            /* A random guid is generated. */
            "fieldGuid": "guid"    }
}

Configuration File Definitions

Each of the configuration options that are available have a default in the configuration file. The default is listed in italics with each definition of the configuration option listed below.

  • schema” : This is used to select what type of data structure type is going to be generated. The default iskeyvalue for this option.
  • count” : This provides the total records that are to be generated by the library. The default is 1 for this option.
  • write_source” : This provides the location to output the generated data to. The default is console for this option.
  • fields” : This is a JSON field within the JSON configuration file that provides configuration options around the fields, number of fields and their respective data to generate. The default is one field, with a default data type of guid. Each of the respective entries in this JSON option is a self contained JSON name and value pair. This then looks simply like this (which is also shown above in part):
    {
        "someBoolean": "boolean",
        "someChar": "character",
        "aFloat": "float",
        "GetAnInt": "integer",
        "fieldTwo": "d20",
        "diceRollD10": "d10",
        "_string": {
            "fieldName": "NameOfFieldForString",
            "length": 5,
            "pool": "abcdefgh"
        },
        "_sentence": {
            "fieldName": "NameOfFiledOfSentences",
            "sentence": "5"
        },
        "fieldGuid": "guid"
    }
    
  • Fields Configuration: For each of the fields you can either set the field to a particular data type or leave it empty. If the field name and value pair is left empty then the field defaults to guid. The types of data to generate for fields are listed below. These listed are all simple field and data generation types. More complex nested generation types are listed below under Complex Field Configuration below the simple section.
    • boolean“: This generates a boolean value of true or false.
    • character“: This generates a single character, such as ‘1’, ‘g’ or ‘N’.
    • float“: This generates a float value, similar to something like -211920142886.5024.
    • integer“: This generates an integer value, similar to something like 1, 14 or 24032.
    • d4“: This generates a random integer value based on a dice roll of one four sided dice. The integer range being 1-10.
    • d6“: This generates a random integer value based on a dice roll of one six sided dice. The integer range being 1-10.
    • d8“: This generates a random integer value based on a dice roll of one eight sided dice. The integer range being 1-10.
    • d10“: This generates a random integer value based on a dice roll of one ten sided dice. The integer range being 1-10.
    • d12“: This generates a random integer value based on a dice roll of one twelve sided dice. The integer range being 1-10.
    • d20“: This generates a random integer value based on a dice roll of one twenty sided dice. The integer range being 1-20.
    • d30“: This generates a random integer value based on a dice roll of one thirty sided dice. The integer range being 1-10.
    • d100“: This generates a random integer value based on a dice roll of one hundred sided dice. The integer range being 1-10.
    • guid“: This generates a random globally unique identifier. This value would be similar to ‘F0D8368D-85E2-54FB-73C4-2D60374295E3’, ‘e0aa6c0d-0af3-485d-b31a-21db00922517’ or ‘1627f683-efeb-4db8-8174-a5f2e3378c87’.
  • Complex Field Configuration: Some fields require more complex configuration for data generation, simply because the data needs some baseline of what the range or length of the values need to be. The following list details each of these. It is also important to note that these complex field configurations do not have defaults, each value must be set in the JSON configuration or an error will be thrown detailing that a complex field type wasn’t designated. Each of these complex field types is a JSON name and value parameter. The name is the passed in data type with a preceding underscore ‘_’ to generate with the value having the configuration parameters for that particular data type.
    • _string“: This generates string data based on a length and pool parameters. Required fields for this include fieldNamelength and pool. The JSON would look like this:
      "_string": {
          "fieldName": "NameOfFieldForString",
          "length": 5,
          "pool": "abcdefgh"
      }
      

      Samples of the result would look like this for the field; ‘abdef’, ‘hgcde’ or ‘ahdfg’.

    • _hash“: This generates a hash based on the length and upper parameters. Required fields for this included fieldNamelength and upper. The JSON would look like this:
      "_hash": {
          "fieldName": "HashFieldName",
          "length": 25,
          "casing": 'upper'
      }
      

      Samples of the result would look like this for the field: ‘e5162f27da96ed8e1ae51def1ba643b91d2581d8’ or ‘3F2EB3FB85D88984C1EC4F46A3DBE740B5E0E56E’.

    • _name”: This generates a name based on the middle, *middleinitial* and prefix parameters. Required fields for this included fieldNamemiddlemiddle_initial and prefix. The JSON would look like this:
      "_name": {
          "fieldName": "nameFieldName",
          "middle": true,
          "middle_initial": true,
          "prefix": true
      }
      

      Samples of the result would look like this for the field: ‘Dafi Vatemi’, ‘Nelgatwu Powuku Heup’, ‘Ezme I Iza’, ‘Doctor Suosat Am’, ‘Mrs. Suosat Am’ or ‘Mr. Suosat Am’.

So that covers the kick start of how eventually you’ll be able to setup, use and generate data. Until then, jump into the project and give us a hand.

After this, more examples on the way, cheers!

JavaScript

Plotting Good Things in Portland :: pdxbridge.js / WTF Databases /

Several people got together yesterday to start planning things for 2014 in PDX. It ranged from coding workshops to PDX Node to Node PDX to what kind of food to eat at for lunch. Ya know, daily tactical things that come along with the big picture items. 😉

bridge.js badge.

bridge.js badge.

Two things that I want to bring up to the community out there. One is a workshop that I’ll likely lead efforts to organize and the other is something I’ll just call pdxbridge.js for now. The workshop will cover the topics of which and what databases to use for what data and how to implement. The pdxbridge.js project is about determining the raised or lowered state of the bridges here in Portland.

Some of the other projects, workshops and other topics we discussed included getting a workshop put together around unit, integration and testing code from a behavioral, test driven development or other approaches. This workshop we don’t have anyone to teach, but we’d (ok, so I really really would love to attend a workshop on this) really like to find somebody who would be willing to teach a workshop of this sort, with a focus on Javascript as the language. On that same topic however, if you’re into Java, Erlang, Scala, Haskell or others and would like to teach a TDD, BDD or related testing workshop please get in touch with me. We will work on making that happen! Ping me at adron at composite code dot com. 😉

Workshop: Intro to Databases & Data

(Relational, Key/Value, Distributed, Graph, Event Series, etc.)

This is a course I’ll lead and others will work with me on to put something extra useful together. We will then teach the workshop as a group, kind of a team paired programming teaching workshop. If there is anything in particular that you’d like to learn about, any questions that you have about data and usage in applications or otherwise add your two cents on this blog entries comments. Over the next month we’ll be putting together the material and have the course available sometime early this year. So if you’d like to attend, jump in at any time with the conversation or just keep a read here and I’ll have more information about the course as we get it put together.

Let’s Make pdxbridge.js Happen!

The pdxbridge.js project is all about determining if a bridge in Portland is up or down. Right now there are  several bridges that matter, that are on this list;

If we add other information to track about the bridges we might add the other 3 that exist and the new bridge that is being built. however the five listed are the only bridges that have a raised and lowered state, and in one case the Steel Bridge has a lowered, partially raised and fully raised state. As shown on the pdxbridge.js badge I threw together (shown above).

To get involved with pdxbridge.js go add your input on this issue I started to discuss our first meet, plan and hack.

In Portland, Work With Data? Happy Data Hour…

Happy Data Hour is happening this Thursday, I just stumbled upon it and met the organizers and others. It will be a top group of fun people talking about all sorts of modern data ideas, advances and related topics. In addition, drinks are on the organizers of Keen.io and Digital Ocean. I hear that (and they may be organizers too, that Firebase and Chroma)

I’ll be there with an interest in conversing related to my latest startup project, how data relates to that and generally putting away a drink or two. So please do come and enjoy a good time….  cheers, and bottoms up!

Review via Calagator and RSVP on Eventbrite.