Category Archives: Cloud Foundry

Where Am I?

That title sounds like a Dream Theater song or something. But alas, I’m going to try and answer the question for the next few weeks per my calendar of logistics.

  • September 10th (Monday) – September 14th (Friday) I’ll be in Seattle for networking, work and a few rounds. Maybe a geek lunch or two too, who’s up for it?
  • September 20th (Thursday) I’ll be in Seattle for the Software Craftsman’s Meetup at Getty Images.
  • September 22nd (Saturday) I’ll be at the Portland Streetcar eastside Loop Party. Yeah yeah, it doesn’t really have anything to do with tech, but I’m a transit nerd, so gotta go see the new streetcar line.
  • October 8th (Monday) – October 17th (Wednesday) I’ll be in San Francisco for the RICON (A Distributed System Conference for Developers) and the HTML 5 Dev Conf (js, html5 and all that developer conference).

Thor & Cloud Foundry Hackathon & Installfest

Curious if anyone is up for meeting and doing an installfest or hacking on Cloud Foundry, Iron Foundry or checking out Thor this coming week in Seattle? Any takers? Leave a comment and I’ll also ping the people of the Twitterverse and App.net. I’m up for meeting at a coffee shop or other space and would be happy to come to an office or other environment if anyone is interested.

Adam & Krishan Got Me Motivated Today… to toss the trash conversations

I was speaking with Krishan Subramanian (@krishnan) and Adam Seligman (@adamse) today. I love talking to these guys. They’re both smart, intelligent and upbeat guys. They see the positive things we’re all working toward and accomplishing in the technology space, specifically around PaaS, Cloud Computing and around the cultural implications of stronger technology communities, involvement of individuals. We all can see the positives, of how the industry is moving forward so that corporations aren’t the only enablers that are juxtaposed against developers or consumers but instead act to serve consumers based on the progress that individuals make themselves. There’s so much to do and so much progress to be made, the venders can simply follow the community and step up to provide points of leadership.

Absolutely great talking with these guys…

On that topic, what is it that we discussed that has me so motivated? Well there’s a few things that I’m done with and I’m going to make every effort to just throw away the trash. Here’s a few of these things that we discussed and I challenge everybody out there, drop the trash talk and let’s move forward because there is a LOT of awesome things to accomplish. Here’s the two things I’m just dropping…  cold. No reason to discuss them anymore.

  • Toss the language and framework religious wars. It is far simpler than it is sometimes perceived. We have a polyglot industry now where we can easily use the right tool for the job, the right framework, or the language that handles our particular domain the best. There is literally no reason to argue about this anymore. Of course we can talk semantics, debate best use cases, and of course we’ll talk accomplishments and what various things do well. That’s exactly what the focus should be on, not the harping on my X is better than your Y nonsense.
  • The culture war is basically over. Sure there are the hold outs that haven’t gotten a clue yet. But it’s an open source world at this point. Even the dreaded and horrible Oracle has generally conceded this and is frantically waving its marketing arms around trying to get attention. But at the core, mysql, java and the other things that they’ve purchased they’re keeping alive. They’re active participants in the community now, albeit in a somewhat strange way. Considering that even Oracle, Microsoft, Apple and so many others contribute back to the open source community in massive ways, that war can be considered won. Victory, the community and every individual in that community!
  • Lockin is basically dead. The technological reasons to lock in are gone, seriously. There’s some issues around data gravity that are to be overcome, but that’s where a solid architecture (see below) comes in. Anything you need can be contributed to and derived from the development community. Get involved and figure out how technology can be a major piece of your business in a positive way. If you design something poorly, lock in becomes a huge issue. Use the rights tools, don’t get into binding contracts, because in the polyglot world we’re in now there’s no reason to be permanently locked in to anything. Be flexible, be where you need to be, and make those decisions based on the community, your support systems, and your business partners. Don’t tie yourself to vendors unless there is mutual reasons to do exactly that. Lock in is a dead conversation, just don’t, time to move on.

So what are the key conversations today?

  • Ecosystem Architecture – If you’re deploying to AWS, Heroku, Tier 3, AppFog or Windows Azure it all boils down to something very specific that will make or break you. Your architecture. This is where the real value add in the cloud & respective systems are, but there are many discussions and many elements of the technology to understand. This is a fundamentally key conversation topic in the industry today. Pick this one up and drop the other trash.
  • Movement & Data Gravity – How do you access your data, how do you store it, where and how do you derive insight from that data? This is one of the topics that came up in our discusssion and it is huge. The entire computer industry basically exists for the reason of insight. What should we eat today, how do I shift my investments, how is my development team doing, what’s the status of my house being built, where is my family today and can I contact them! All of these things are insights we derive from computer systems. These are the fundamental core reason that computers exist. As an industry we’re finally getting to a point were we can get some pretty solid insightful, intelligent and useful information from our systems. The conversation however continues, there is so much more we can still achieve. So again, drop the wasteful convo and jump on board the conversations about data, information and insights!
  • Community Involvement – I’ve left the key topic for last. This is huge, companies have to be involved today. Companies aren’t dictating progress but instead the community is leading as it should. The community is providing a path for companies to follow or lead, but the community, the individuals are the ones that are seen and known to be innovating. This is so simple it’s wild that it is only now becoming a known reality – companies don’t innovate, people do. Companies don’t involve, people do. Individuals are the drivers of companies, the drivers of Governments, they’re the ones driving innovation and progress. The focus should now and should have always been on the individuals and what they’re working toward to accomplish. So get involved, get the companies involved as a whole and keep the semantic ideal of individuals and the progress they can make core to the way you think of communities. The idea of the “company” innovating is silly, let’s talk and build community with the people that are working around and innovating with these technologies.

Of course there are more, I’d love to hear your take on what the conversations of today should be about. What do we need to resolve? How do we improve our lives, our work and the efforts we’re working toward on a day to day basis?

How Software Should Get Done, Continually Delivering!

Tonight I spoke at the PADNUG Meetup in Hillsboro, a suburb of Portland, Oregon. The ladies and gentlemen of PADNUG are a great crew, so I actually go out of my way to the suburbs to speak there. Tonight was an exceptionally good experience with a great talk, lots of back and forth between everyone there and great conversations continued late into the night at the local suburban watering hole. All in all a good topic of conversation and one that needs brought to more teams.

Continuous Delivery

How does this fold into my work on PaaS (Platform as a Service) and IaaS (Infrastructure as a Service)? Easy, with the cloud computing capabilities of PaaS and IaaS it makes continuous delivery a no brainer. At least 50% of the effort to get continuous delivery setup is already done with these technologies. Over the next few weeks I’ll be writing a lot about these technologies and the enablement of continuous delivery through these technologies. Just as important as the technology, I’ll also be talking about the processes, ideals and lean thinking that have birthed this tech.

In my presentation I covered a lot of these ideas and efforts. For now, here’s my slide deck with all the information to contact me. If you’d like me to pop into your town and present on these topics, just let me know and we’ll see about me getting onsite.

Coming up on the 20th I’ll be presenting some of this material plus a very hands on demo at the Software Craftsman’s meeting is Seattle titled “Coding in the Cloud, Kick Ass Continuously“. So if you live in the Seattle or are just in the area, drop in!

The Bad, The Ugly and The Good Bits :: Sexism, VMworld 2012 & Smart Cool People

The Divide in Technologists…

Sexism & Those That are Building Tech

There seems to be a pretty distinctive divide in the technology industry today. There are the young, open minded, devop oriented, free-thinking individuals and then there are the old guard of IT. This later group still brings the “booth babes” and finds an incessant need to assume all women aren’t technologists (which I might add is utter bullshit). This is when I’m going to rant for a minute.

[rant=on]

Ok guys, pull your heads out of your collective asses. I’ve spoke to 11 ladies that are hard core technologists, that would take your old guard IT and replace your sorry ass with a shell script plus some cloud computing and leave you to the dogs. They’re programmers, devops pros, hackers and entrepreneurs  Simply, they kick as much ass as anybody, so shove off.

This however brings up the question, “Why the hell does the conference still perpetuate this bullshit with booth babes and mindless dribble?”  Seriously, can we focus on the technology, the reason we’re here? To learn, to build, to maintain, create and extend our services and capabilities that we work with? Can we not have a mass of “talent” come and stand around just so aging IT guys can ogle their breasts with roaming eyeballs?

Don’t get me wrong, beautiful people are great, and when done tastefully things can be fun. One of the ladies I work with mentioned it’d be great if Thor showed up and hung out at the conference (cuz ya see, we have a product called Thor, and this data company had Data attend. (Brent Spiner)).

I could go on. Simply put, companies and conference organizers need to own up and get with the times. For those of us that are a little evolved past nuckle dragging we should stand up to this time of nonsense. There’s a reason we’re at a conference and it damn well shouldn’t be to devalue people as objects and ogle various body parts.

[rant=off]

Ok, back on track with the successful bits. There were, after all a lot of successful bits and the sexism is a small, yet very sad and noticeable part of the event. The other good news is the amount of women’s groups that are getting together these days to code  (and I also find it unfortunate that to create a positive environment, women usually have to entirely disengage with men, and it is generally men’s fault)  Yup I said code. Rails Girls, Code n’ Splode and many others. So if you’re reading this and are female, check these groups out and get hacking & devoping.

The Big Move, PaaS is Starting to Rock!

VMware made serveral announcements around Cloud Foundry, which is pretty huge. The momentum is still growing, the community is still growing, and the energy is contagious. There’s been some egregious accusations and suggestions that the Cloud Foundry ecosystem is going to collapse. This is, however one of the more absurd notions I’ve heard in months. This definitely falls into the category of FUD flinging with no concrete notion. Lucas (@cardmagic) from AppFog lays out a bit of reality though, and the 20k people at VMworld and the thousands using and hundreds coding to Cloud Foundry give a resounding shout of,

“HELL NO”

Cloud Foundry is not collapsing, VMware is not taking an unfair advantage, and they’re in a position to win along with all the rest of the advocates of PaaS and open source. The thing is, things can indeed be win-win. They don’t have to be win-lose and the later thinking is negative to the industry and counter to the reality of open source.

Either way, toss any ideas this is going away out of your minds. I know most of you already have.

Smart People, Networking and a Few Rounds

The greatest thing about these conferences is the ability to network and meet face to face with hundreds of people that I do business with everyday. These range from people I hack code with, to people I help implement Cloud Foundry or people that simply are involved in the community too. To me, the most valuable ROI is the networking at a conference. Just to throw a few out there, I got to catch up with…

  • Dave McCrory @mccrory – This guy is awesome, if you get to work with him you’re a lucky soul. He’s heading up WMG as SVP of Platform Engineering now to get some cool things built and build out a solid team, which I look forward to hearing about!
  • Andy Piper @andypiper – Andy is VMware’s Cloud Foundry Dev Advocate of Great Britain. I got to meet Andy a while back and got to team up with him and many others to catch up on Cloud Foundry, see were things are heading, talk through some ideas and generally cause mischief around San Francisco.
  • James Watters @wattersjames – I always love running into this guy. Top notch smart, snarky and always ready to go through who’s who and who’s doing what in cloud technology. He’s the VMware Director of Ecosystem for Cloud Foundry and they’re damn lucky to have this guy!
  • Brian McClain @brianmmcclain – When I was originally writing Brian’s name out, I mispelled it “brain” and almost just left it this way. Brian is all over the Cloud Foundry realm working with BOSH, pushing forward with Cloud Foundry in an enterprise environment, and generally always ready to dive into the tech heavy deep end. Always great chatting with Brian about the details and whatever random code adventures come up!

…and there were dozens of others I got to catch up with. Mark Kropf, Ken Robertson, Daine Mueller, Jeremy Voorhis and almost got to catch up with Derek Collison too. Well, there’s always the next trip to San Francisco! If you’re into the Cloud Foundry space, into PaaS technologies, or just interested definitely reach out, follow these guys on twitter, and make an effort to meet them.

VMware’s VMworld Summary

VMworld was good times, for sure. There were the hiccups as I pointed out, but overall a great experience, the organizers did a solid job (still would help if they could crack down on the companies that perpetuate sexism and BS over content on the booth/show floor, but otherwise, kudos on a job well done). It was great catching up with the brain power in the industry and finally meeting many people I’d been wanting to. I even wrote more than a few lines of code and tested out a few deployment ideas based on the conversations. This, in the end, is exactly what the conference is truly about.  Cheers!

Thor Brings the Hamma! Cloud Foundry OS-X, Windows 7 and Windows 8 Interfaces FTW!

One of the things that I do in my work is lead the efforts around creating and leading open source projects. As regular readers may know, I’m big into open source efforts, especially around PaaS. My preferred PaaS offering these days for internal, external and public cloud PaaS is Cloud Foundry (with Iron Foundry for all of my .NET needs). Today the we made the projects official and I’m charging forward with a a great team of people. You’ll be able to use these new user interfaces for Cloud Foundry against Tier 3 Web Fabrics, CloudFoundry.com, Stackato, AppFog and any other company that uses Cloud Foundry at the core and exposes the web service APIs for use!

Thor & Thor.NET

In a couple weeks we’ll be making the github repositories completely public, open sourcing the code & products entirely and looking forward to working with the community to make these tools as awesome as we can. For now, if you’d like to jump into the repositories and see where we are and what we’re up to as we step toward opening them completely, sign up via “early access“. We’ll get you setup on the repo so you can fork, pull and add you’re own signature bits.

Why did we name the project Thor? Well, we’ve been spearheading the Iron Foundry Community efforts for .NET support on Cloud Foundry so we figured we needed someone to bring the hamma to the battle, nobody better than Thor for that!

I’ll have a regular write up of snippets, code and other things I’m working on here so subscribe and give me a follow on Twitter (@adron) and App.net (@adron). Also, for official open source releases of the project check out the Iron Foundry Organization site that has the Iron Foundry downloads, source, Thor and the official Iron Foundry Blog.

Deploy a Framework Friday #3 with node.js + express.js

Time for the node.js “Deploy a Framework Friday”. First get node.js and express.js installed (i.e. npm install express) and then create your node.js application.

adron$ express nodejs

   create : nodejs
   create : nodejs/package.json
   create : nodejs/app.js
   create : nodejs/public
   create : nodejs/public/javascripts
   create : nodejs/public/images
   create : nodejs/public/stylesheets
   create : nodejs/public/stylesheets/style.css
   create : nodejs/routes
   create : nodejs/routes/index.js
   create : nodejs/views
   create : nodejs/views/layout.jade
   create : nodejs/views/index.jade

   dont forget to install dependencies:
   $ cd nodejs && npm install

Once the app is installed open up the app.js file and edit the code so that it reflects what is shown below.

var express = require('express')
  , routes = require('./routes');

var app = module.exports = express.createServer();

// Configuration

app.configure(function(){
  app.set('views', __dirname + '/views');
  app.set('view engine', 'jade');
  app.use(express.bodyParser());
  app.use(express.methodOverride());
  app.use(app.router);
  app.use(express.static(__dirname + '/public'));
});

app.configure('development', function(){
  app.use(express.errorHandler({ dumpExceptions: true, showStack: true }));
});

app.configure('production', function(){
  app.use(express.errorHandler());
});

// Routes

app.get('/', routes.index);

// Cloud Foundry Environment Variables
var port = (process.env.VMC_APP_PORT || 3000);

app.listen(port);
console.log("Cloud Foundry Demo Express server listening on port %d in %s mode.", app.address().port, app.settings.env);

The emphasis is the port variable added for the VMC_APP_PORT. This variable is needed by the Cloud Foundry system to know which port that node will use to host on, which Cloud Foundry will then intelligently map to so you will get the standard default port 80 activity you expect. For more information about all this hosting mess with node.js check out one of my previous write ups on the topic on the New Relic Blog.

Once you’ve setup this file, then just deploy using the with npm support option that states the version of node.

vmc push --version=node06

For more information about deploying node apps with npm module dependencies check out this blog entry on “Cloud Foundry supports node.js modules with NPM“.

All done. Yes, there is more Deploy a Framework Fridays coming up, so stay tuned!

OSCON Day #3, #4, and Friday => Bailey’s Taproom, Cloud Camp, Cloud Foundry, Open Shift, PaaS, vert.x, and so much more…

Tuesday night, as usual ended with great technical conversation at Bailey’s Taproom. Bailey’s is basically the epicenter of the Portland tech scene. Almost every programmer, devops, or technical person either goes about once a month or has this establishment as a regular watering hole! It’s great, the atmosphere is chill, the beer is SUPERB, the beer menu kicks ass (see: Beer Dashboard Kick’s Ass) and the list of fun cool things just continues on and on.

This week of course OSCON adds a little spice to the regular roll call at Bailey’s. There were a number of conversations that broke out, which I’ve broken out the key topics below:

vert.x => To summarize as is written on the site itself, “Write your application components in JavaScript, Ruby, Groovy or Java. Or mix and match several programming languages in a single application. Create real, scalable applications in just a few lines of code. No sprawling xml config. Scale using messaging passing and immutable shared data to efficiently utilise your server cores. Super-simple concurrency model frees you from the hassles of traditional multi-threaded programming.

Here’s an example from the site in a few of the languages:

Java

import org.vertx.java.core.Handler;
import org.vertx.java.core.http.HttpServerRequest;
import org.vertx.java.deploy.Verticle;

public class Server extends Verticle {
    public void start() {
        vertx.createHttpServer().requestHandler(new Handler() {
            public void handle(HttpServerRequest req) {
                String file = req.path.equals("/") ? "index.html" : req.path;
                req.response.sendFile("webroot/" + file);
            }
        }).listen(8080);
    }
}

JavaScript

load('vertx.js')

vertx.createHttpServer().requestHandler(function(req) {
    var file = req.path === '/' ? 'index.html' : req.path;
    req.response.sendFile('webroot/' + file);
}).listen(8080)

Ruby

require "vertx"

Vertx::HttpServer.new.request_handler do |req|
    file = req.uri == "/" ? "index.html" : req.uri
    req.response.send_file "webroot/#{file}"
end.listen(8080)

Wednesday Roughness

I felt beat up a bit start Wednesday, but rolled into it after a short while. Needless to say, the intensity of conversations (and maybe a few of those rounds of beer) and number of ideas, new things to check out and fitting it all in can wear one out.

The morning sessions were solid, I attended most of “Comparing Open Source Private Cloud Platforms“. Lance did a solid job of laying out the tooling, virtualization software and where these things come together to form a number of OSS options for cloud computing. Check out more from Lance on his @ramereth, his blog Lance Albertson, or check out his band he’s in “The Infallible Collective“.

Wednesday, Thursday and Friday Meets

I met a ton of people. All of whom I must say, I hope to get to talk to again, work with on projects, or just sling some code sometime. Absolutely great people, friendly, intelligent and highly motivated. Some of these people I met included:

Andy Piper (@andypiper) – Part of Great Britain’s contingent of VMware Cloud Foundry advocates and such. We got to hang out and talk about a zillion different topics at a number of events. Andy was kind enough to show me a few tips and tricks he’s been using with Cloud Foundry, the VMC, and in general working with the platform.

Josh Long (@starbuxman) – I met Josh once before on the Cloud Foundry open tour, where he brought COBOL programming… oh no wait, he brought some great Sprint Java samples and such to demo on the Cloud Foundry Platform. I fulfilled Josh’s dreams by telling him that COBOL, could indeed run on Cloud Foundry thanks to the .NET capabilities of Iron Foundry! (ya know, if anybody is into that type of thing)

Erica Brescia (@ericabrescia) – I finally got to meet Erica in person, after chit chatting on Twitter about all the great applications her company Bitnami helps to deploy in the cloud. There are some really great deployment hosting solutions from them, check them out if you’re looking for some streamlined deployment practices. She also mentioned I need to meet…

Jono Bacon (@jonobacon) – I managed to meet Jono by randomness. He’s, well, let’s say he does some absolutely great work in the tech industry for Canonical and in the open source universe. In addition Jono has some superb tastes in music.  \m/  \m/  Check out some of his work:  Blog, personal site, and you can probably google him too. Do it, he’s got a lot of great material out there.

As I was saying, these aren’t the only people that I met. To all those people I didn’t mention, it was awesome hanging out, catching up and hearing about what everyone is working on and creating.

PaaS, IaaS and The Driving Open Source Coders

On the topic of PaaS, it continues to expand into new realms of publicly (or privately) run services. PaaS is quickly expanding past mere framework services around .NET, PHP, Rails, Sinatra and such and moving into the realm of databases, services buses, and other capabilities as a service. As laid out with the SOA mindset. Even though enterprises failed to bring SOAP to an effective worldwide use, RESTful services are expanding rapidly. *aaS is pushing those even further, to do what the enterprise had wanted but failed to do. Creating a universal acceptance of scalable, powerful, expandable and extensible services through APIs.

As more services are extended we’ll start seeing a lot of offerings around truly scalable databases with various feature sets around those databases offered as a key service. Examples would include “atomic database as a service”, “transactional data store as a service”, or “document store as a service”. In the end it will include the amount of usefulness for the services while eliminating a need to know each in intimate detail. Knowing the core capabilities of an option and just using the service will grossly outpace the attempt to implement these services internally.

So keep watching PaaS to grow in many various ways. Consuming the service being the driver over attempting to build the service. Of course, if the service doesn’t exist, get on that it’s business opportunity!

Random OSCON Diversions

I had a great time visiting with family while at OSCON also. To whom they all send a hello and horns up, thrash on salute to the coders of the world!

Voodoo Donut Break with Florida Family Contingent

Voodoo Donut Break with Florida Family Contingent.

My brother Adam, the IT Department

My brother Adam, the IT Department

My Brother Runs an IT Shop of One…

…thanks to cloud computing capabilities.

This kind of blew my mind. I sort of of knew what he did, but it didn’t hit me how close our professional lives are until this trip. He’s just recently moved several hundred miles away from the main office, but still manages the entire company.

One of the unique happenstances is, my brother (the guy next to the bald guy that is me, he’s wearing a Tesla t-shirt) is the top IT guy for a little billion dollar a year company. Which, in this case, he’s proven the power of cloud computing. Why do I say this? Because traditionally this organization would have needed an army of PC techs, network knob fiddlers, and such. But with the advantages of cloud computing, both on premise and off premise, and have a DevOps Guy that knows what he’s doing they are able to efficiently run their entire company with one single guy.

Needless to say, with the synergy of OSCON we had more than a few conversations around tech. Some of those included the replacement of PCs with mobile devices, such as iPads or smart phones. Another was the mix of on-premise data that couldn’t easily be transferred or utilized form cloud services. These are just a few fo the things that have helped him to run the show, the entire show.

Summary

OSCON was awesome. Next time I will be taking off a day or two before and a day or two afterwards so that I can do an even more elaborate write up of the event. My aim is to have interviews, video and otherwise, and really step it up in relation to providing an eye into the event from a developer’s point of view.