Tag Archives: meetup

Meetup Video: “Does the Cloud Kill Open Source?”

ūüÜē¬†Had a great time at the last Seattle Scalability Meetup. I’ve also just finished processing and fixing up the talk video from this last Seattle Scalability Meetup. I feel like I’ve finally gotten the process of streaming and getting things put together post-stream so that I can make them available almost immediately afterwards.

Here @rseroter gives us a full review of various business models, open source licenses, and a solid situational report on cloud providers and open source.

Join the meetup group here: https://www.meetup.com/Seattle-Scalability-Meetup/

The next meetup on April 23rd we’ve got Dr. Ryan Zhang coming in to talk about serverless options. More details, and additional topic content will be coming soon.

Then in May, on the 28th, Guinevere (@guincodes) is going to present “The Pull Request That Wouldn’t Merge”. More details, and additional topic content will be coming soon.

Here’s some of the talks I streamed recently. Note, didn’t have the gear setup all that well just yet, but the content is there!

Machine Learning, Protocols, Classification, and Clustering

Today Suz Hinton @noopkat and Amanda Moran @AmandaDataStax are presenting, “Alternative Protocols – how offline machines can still talk to each other” and “Classification and Clustering Algorithms paired with Wine and Chocolate” respectively. The aim is to stream these talks tonight too on my Thrashing Code Twitch Channel. If you can attend in person, we’re almost at capacity so make sure you snag one of the remaining RSVP’s.

Here’s some more details on the speakers for tonight.

Continue reading

September & October Op & Dev Dis Sys Meetups Posted

I’m excited to announce several new speakers coming to Seattle. Meet Karthik Ramasamy, Joseph Jacks, and Luc Perkins. They’re going to cover a range of technologies, but to list just a few; Heron, messaging, queueing, streaming, Apache Cassandra, Apache Pulsar, Prometheus, Kubernetes, and others.

Everybody meet Karthik Ramasamy!

Karthik_Ramasamy_17K0108_Crop32_Web

Karthik Ramasamy

Karthik Ramasamy is the co-founder of Streamlio that focuses on building next generation real time infrastructure. Before Streamlio, he was the engineering manager and technical lead for real-time infrastructure at Twitter where he co-created Twitter Heron. He has two decades of experience working with companies such as Teradata, Greenplum, and Juniper in their rapid growth stages building parallel databases, big data infrastructure, and networking. He co-founded Locomatix, a company that specializes in real-time streaming processing on Hadoop and Cassandra using SQL, that was acquired by Twitter. Karthik has a Ph.D. in computer science from the University of Wisconsin, Madison with a focus on big data and databases. During his college tenure several of his research projects were later spun off as a company acquired by Teradata. Karthik is the author of several publications, patents, and Network Routing: Algorithms, Protocols and Architectures.

Presentation: Unifying Messaging, Queuing, Streaming & Light Weight Compute with Apache Pulsar

Data processing use cases, from transformation to analytics, perform tasks that require various combinations of queuing, streaming and lightweight processing steps. Until now, supporting all of those needs has required different systems for each task–stream processing engines, messaging queuing middleware, and streaming messaging systems. That has led to increased complexity for development and operations.

In this session, we’ll discuss the need to unify these capabilities in a single system and how Apache Pulsar was designed to address that. Apache Pulsar is a next generation distributed pub-sub system that was developed and deployed at Yahoo. Karthik, will explain how the architecture and design of Pulsar provides the flexibility to support developers and applications needing any combination of queuing, messaging, streaming and lightweight compute.

Everybody meet Joseph Jacks & Luc Perkins!

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Joseph Jacks & Luc Perkins

More about Joseph

https://twitter.com/asynchio
https://www.linkedin.com/in/josephjacks/

Joseph was the founder and organizer of KubeCon (the Kubernetes community conference, donated to and now run by the Linux Foundation’s CNCF). He also co-founded Kismatic (the first commercial open source Kubernetes tools and services company), acquired by Apprenda in 2016. Joseph previously worked at Enstratius Networks (acquired by Dell Software), TIBCO, and Talend (2016 IPO). He was also a founding strategy and product consultant at Mesosphere. Recently, Joseph served as a corporate EIR at Quantum Corporation in support of the Rook project. He currently serves as the co-founder and CEO of a new stealth technology startup.

More about Luc

https://twitter.com/lucperkins
https://www.linkedin.com/in/luc-perkins-a087b322/

Luc has joined the tech industry a few years back after a foray in choral tunes and thrashing guitar virtuosity. Educated at Reed in Portland Oregon and then on to Duke where he wrapped up. Then back to Portlandia and then joined AppFog for a bit working in he platform as a service world before delving into the complexities of distributed databases at Basho. Having working with Luc there along with Eric Redmond I wasn’t surprised to see Luc just release the 2nd edition of the Seven Databases in Seven Weeks book. Recently he also joined CNCF as a Developer Advocate after drifting through some time at Twitter and Streamli working on streaming & related distributed systems.

Presentation: Prometheus, Grafana, Kubernetes, and a Cassandra Cluster

Over the past few years, Prometheus has emerged as a best-of-breed OSS monitoring and observability solution. In this talk, I’ll walk you through setting up a full-fledged Prometheus setup for a Cassandra cluster running on Kubernetes, including Grafana dashboards, Alertmanager notifications via Slack, and more.

Presentations: Title TBD – Stay Tuned!

I’ll post more details on Joseph’s talk in the next couple of days. But you can get an idea that it’ll be some seriously interesting material!

RSVP to the Meetups Here

Learn You Some Smarts for Great Good!

Like to code? Like to learn? Live in Portland? Well then you ought to join me in my great journey to the dark west hills of the lands of Hillsboro¬†and Intel! I’ll be taking the following grand journey from Portland out to Intel to give a presentation on Pluralsight and teaching, learning, and getting smarts for great good! If you’d like to join me RSVP on the meetup invite here and let me know, I’m happy to transit out to the location with you.

Afterwards, as is standard operating procedure, we’ll have dinner, drinks, and food across the street at . Sure to have good conversation and laughs, as¬†I always endeavor to do.

Ride Out With Me…

If you’re interested in riding out with me, join me at the Old Town China Town MAX Stop at 5:00pm. We’ll depart on the MAX Blue Line out to Hawthorn Farms Intel Campus.¬†Afterwards, if interested I’ll be riding back too after the meet and post-meet meet at Morgy’s Pub & Grill¬†(across the street).

What I’ll be Talking About

Pluralsight is one of the leading online educators of online, video-based, technical content in the world. In my presentation I’ll dive into how Pluralsight maintains integrity of its courses, insures learning, encourages quality, and helps keep the whole system moving forward in a seamless way. This presentation will be a small diversion from the technical components we often discuss as developers and instead a dive into the actual systems of learning, training, and production that are often on the edges of what we see as developers – but benefit greatly from when we want to learn something new!¬†The core three things I’ll be covering include:

  • How video & doing helps us learn quickly.
  • How video is produced and the tools of this trade.
  • How to produce effective technical content to teach.
  • How to effectively use technical content to learn.

Once I finish the talk I’ll provide a wrap up here on the blog. My intention is to do more than merely post the slides, I’ll¬†work to put something together that’s actually useful.

Speaking of Pluralsight

I’m also working on a new course right now! Ok, at this very moment I’m sipping a Black Forest Mocha at Coffee People while typing this blog entry while waiting for arrivals at the airport, but you know what I mean. I’ll have¬†a basic outline and material for that course posted soon. For more on this pending course and other code event happenings,¬†subscribe to the blog (scroll up and click the settings hexagon above) and or follow me on twitter @adron.

Riak in a .NET World

Jeremiah's Demo Works, IT WORKS IT WORKS!

Jeremiah’s Demo Works, IT WORKS IT WORKS!

A few days ago Troy Howard, Jeremiah Peschka and I all traveled via Amtrak Cascades up to Seattle. The mission was simple, Jeremiah was presenting “Riak in a .NET World”, I was handling logistics and Troy was handling video.

So I took the video that Troy shot, I edited it, put together some soundtrack to it and let Jeremiah’s big data magic shine. He covers the basics around RDBMSes, SQL Server in this case but easily it applies to any RDBMS in large part. These basics bring us up to where and why an architecture needs to shift from an RDBMS solution to a distributed solution like Riak. After stepping through some of the key reasons to move to Riak, Jeremiah walks through a live demo of using CorrugatedIron, the .NET Client for Riak (Github repo). During the walk through he covers the specific characteristics of how CorrugatedIron interacts with Riak through indexs, buckets and during puts and pulls of data.

Toward the end of the video Joseph Blomstedt @jtuple, Troy Howard @thoward37, Jeremiah Peschka @peschkaj, Clive Boulton¬†@iC and Richard Turner @bitcrazed. Also note, I’ve enabled download for this specific video since it is actually a large video (1.08GB total). So you may want to download and watch it if you don’t have a super reliable high speed internet connection.

Also for more on Jeremiah’s work check out http://www.brentozar.com/articles/riak/ ¬†and contact him at http://www.brentozar.com/contact/

The Friday Wrap Up: Write The Docs, Basho Coworking Office Hours & Node PDX

Wow, so this week has been an intense return to Portland for me. I got back earlier in the week and hit the ground doing a bit of catch up after being on the rails for two weeks to Denver, over to San Francisco and then back up here to Portland. The whole time cramming my brain full of Erlang, getting ramped up on efforts to help bring Riak to everybody that it can help, expand the open source community and do what I do. Expand the community and the risk taking, code inventing, hacker of hardware, and curious ideas that we all have as best I can.

Turning from looking back and looking forward, getting into a proactive view of events coming up there are a couple things I want to let everybody know about. They’re all¬†intertwined¬†here in the Portland Tech Community and well beyond, with events in Seattle and Vancouver BC coming up sooner than later!

Basho Coworking Office Hours

The Riak Products; Riak, RiakCS and Riak EnterpriseDS

The Riak Products; Riak, RiakCS and Riak EnterpriseDS

These events are every two weeks, starting this Monday. The meet is at NedSpace, we’ll grab the excellent Butcher’s Block Table and converse, code together, implement or deploy Riak and generally answer, present or find the information you need. Feel free to come in and join at anytime during 9am-11am on Monday the 4th, and every two weeks hereafter. You can RSVP here (meetup.com) or here *(eventbrite). For those that are RSVPed and show we’ll have various swag. Prospectively after building some momentum we’ll start bringing in some premium coffee or other beverages to help kick off your day.

Write The Docs

Write The Docs

Write The Docs

This is a new conference here in Portland that is being put together around documentation, document driven development and topics surrounding this oft overlooked and extremely important aspect of software development. As one would expect, it has a github repo.

Currently there are some speakers, but the call for proposals is still open, so check it out and if you’re interested in speaking jump in there and add to the conference and growing conversation! Here’s a short description from the conference site about what Write The Docs is about,

“Write the Docs is a two-day conference focused on documentation systems, tech writing theory, and information delivery. It will be held on April 8-9 in Portland, Oregon.

Writing and maintaining documentation involves the talents of a multidisciplinary community of technical writers, designers, typesetters, developers, support teams, marketers, and many others.

This conference creates a time and a place for this community of documentarians to share information, discuss ideas, and work together to improve the art and science of documentation.

We invite all those who write the docs to spread the word:

Docs or it didn’t happen!”

Speakers so far… there are more coming!

Nóirín Plunkett Plunkett AKA @noirinp the Curator of People 

From the recent speaker announcement, “N√≥ir√≠n Plunkett is a jack of all trades, and a master of several. By day, she works for Eucalyptus Systems, as a geek<->English translator, and general force multiplier. She‚Äôs passionate about community, communication, and collaboration. N√≥ir√≠n got her open source start at Apache, helping out with the httpd documentation project.

Kenneth Reitz AKA @kennethreitz the Wandering street photographer and moral fallibilist & Pythoner

From the recent speaker announcement, “Kenneth Reitz is the product owner of Python at Heroku and a member of the Python Software Foundation. He embraces minimalism, elegant architecture, and simple interfaces. Kenneth is well known for his many open source projects, specifically Requests. His projects are always well documented, and he is the curator of the The Hitchhiker‚Äôs Guide to Python, which documents best practices for Python developers.

Jim R. Wilson AKA @helixb the jimbojw and helixb and…

From the recent speaker announcement, “Jim R. Wilson started hacking at the age of 13 and never looked back. He has contributed to open source projects such as MediaWiki and HBase, and managed the large-scale documentation system at Vistaprint. He‚Äôs co-author of one NoSQL book, and currently writing a node.js book.

The perpetrators of this conference are the reknown Troy Howard @thoward37, Eric Redmond @coderoshi and a fellow tech cohort I’ve recently met at The Side Door Eric Holscher @ericholscher.

Node PDX

There’s an announcement coming real soon about this!

My Year of Coding, Messaging, Learning, Leading, Reconoitering, and Hacking in Photos

Hope you have a little patience, this blog entry is going to be pretty long. There was a multitude of conferences, more than a hundred pair coding sessions, more cities, hotels and other things as I criss crossed the country helping to knock out projects, code, fire off some open source projects and generally get some technology implemented. It has been a spectacular year. I also could add, it has thoroughly kicked my ass and I’ve loved it.

2012 Coding Projects

In 2012 I’ve taken the healm of the Iron Foundry Project which led to the creation of Tier 3 Web Fabric PaaS. A Cloud Foundry & Iron Foundry .NET based PaaS. From there the project led to an expansion of leading the efforts on the Thor Project, which is a Cloud Foundry User Interface for OS-X and Windows 7. Beyond that I’ve contributed to and participated in dozens of different projects in various ways over the year. I finished up this year by joining Basho in December and thus, joined the Riak & related Basho Projects.

Coding Project Aims For 2013

Some of the projects I’ve started, will join or hope to otherwise continue participation in include the following. Here’s to hoping 2013 is a hard core coding and contributing year of excellence!

  • Many of the Basho Organization’s Projects I’ll be diving into, including work around Rebar, Riak, Docs & a number of others.
  • Name Factory – a project I’ve started a while back of Riak + JavaScript around creating massive test data with JavaScript and also using Riak for the storage & searching on that data created.
  • Criollo – Criollo is one of the most common forms of cocoa, is a native OS-X Cocoa User Interface for distributed systems built on or using Riak.
  • SpikeOp – This I’ve dubbed the name of the iOS¬†interface¬†for distributed systems built on or using Riak.
  • I want to use and possibly contribute to Corrugated Iron, the .NET Client for Riak. Prospectively to use for a Windows 8 User Interface for distributed systems built on or using Riak.
  • I’ll continue to maintain and provide support for the Iron Foundry vcap-client Library currently available via Nuget for .NET.
  • Thor Project for Cocoa¬†&¬†Thor .NET¬†for Cloud Foundry & Iron Foundry.
  • Expand on prospective services for¬†Cloud Foundry, either I or efforts I may lead to do this.

…there are others, but they’ll have to be figured out during the course of events. Also, there are an easy dozen other projects I’ll be working that don’t particularly have to do with coding, two are listed below. For an easy way to keep up with the projects I’m coding on, leading, participating in or otherwise hit me up on Twitter @adron or ADN @adron.

Big Project Aims for 2013

Thrashing Code Project¬†– This is sort of, kind of secret. It’s going to happen soon, I have a personal schedule for it and I’ll be releasing information accordingly when the site and twitter account goes live.

Tour Triumvirate – I intend to plan, and hopefully will take at least 2 of the three tech tours I setup. More information will be forthcoming, but the original notion is outlined in the blog entry I wrote titled “The Adron Code Tour, Let‚Äôs Hack, Bike and Talk Hard Core Technology“.

Books I’ve Read in 2012

All of these I’ve either read or re-read in 2012. I set a goal at the beginning of last year to get my ass in gear when it comes to reading. A focused, get it read, understood and learn approach. I think I did pretty good overall. Not a book a week, but I’m getting back in gear. Considering my best year of reading was 100+ books, it might be a difficult to reach that again since I’m a working citizen, versus a child with plenty of time on their hands. But, it’s good to have goals. ¬†ūüėČ

  • The Clean Coder: A Code of Conduct for Professional Programmers
  • The Rails 3 Way
  • Eloquent Ruby
  • The Economics of Freedom: What Your Professors Won’t Tell You, Selected Works of Frederic Bastiat
  • The Myth of the Robber Barons
  • Excellence Without a Soul: Does Liberal Education Have a Future?
  • Seven Databases in Seven Weeks: A Guide to Modern Databases and the NoSQL Movement
  • Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman!
  • The Innovator’s Dilemma: The Revolutionary Book That Will Change the Way You Do Business
  • The Lean Startup: How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses
  • 8 Things We Hate About IT: How to Move Beyond the Frustrations to Form a New Partnership with IT
  • Smart and Gets Things Done: Joel Spolsky’s Concise Guide to Finding the Best Technical Talent
  • Rework
  • Steve Jobs
  • Eloquent JavaScript: A Modern Introduction to Programming
  • JavaScript: The Good Parts
  • Node for Front-End Developers
  • First Contact (In Her Name: The Last War, #1)
  • Cloudonomics: The Business Value of Cloud Computing
  • The REST API Design Handbook
  • HTML5 Canvas
  • HTML5: Up and Running
  • Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier
  • Traffic

Book Reading Aims for 2013

  • Natural Capitalism
  • How God Changes Your Brain: Breakthrough Findings from a Leading Neuroscientist
  • Discourse on the Method of Rightly Conducting One’s Reason and of Seeking Truth in the Sciences
  • Political Ideals
  • The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
  • Wrestling with Moses: How Jane Jacobs Took On New York’s Master Builder and Transformed the American City
  • Bikenomics: An Introduction to the Bicycle Economy
  • Everyday Bicycling: How to Ride a Bike for Transportation (Whatever Your Lifestyle)
  • Just Ride: A Radically Practical Guide to Riding Your Bike
  • Continuous Delivery: Reliable Software Releases through Build, Test, and Deployment Automation
  • Erlang Programming
  • Building Web Applications with Erlang: Working with REST and Web Sockets on Yaws
  • Think Complexity: Complexity Science and Computational Modeling
  • Async JavaScript
  • Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere (Smashing Magazine Book Series)
  • Windows PowerShell for Developers
  • How to Use the Unix-Linux vi Text Editor
  • Sketching User Experiences: The Workbook
  • Designing Interfaces
  • Information Architecture for the World Wide Web: Designing Large-Scale Web Sites
  • Consider Phlebas
  • Snow Crash
  • How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas
  • Mission, Inc.: The Practitioner‚Äôs Guide to Social Enterprise
  • Simply Complexity
  • Complex Adaptive Systems: An Introduction to Computational Models of Social Life (Princeton Studies in Complexity)
  • Thinking In Systems: A Primer
  • Thinking, Fast and Slow
  • Programming in Objective-C
  • Learning iPad Programming: A Hands-on Guide to Building iPad Apps with iOS 5
  • Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X
  • Getting Started with GEO, CouchDB, and Node.js
  • JavaScript Web Applications
  • Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream
  • Design Patterns in Ruby

…and the two books I’d like to re-read this year because they’re just absurdly entertaining and I’d like a refresher of the stories.

  • A Confederacy of Dunces (I’ll be reading this for the 2nd time)
  • The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (Yup, just want to read it again)

My 2012 Coder’s Year in Photos

What I’ve put together here is a photo story of the year, hopefully it’s entertaining in some way. With that, here’s a review of the year, cheers and happy new year! 2012 started with one of my last hack sessions as a Seattle Resident at Ruby at Racer weekly meetup.

Ruby at Racer Meetup

Ruby at Racer Meetup

Meanwhile some of my last views from Russell Investments. Absolutely beautiful, epic and awe inspiring views of the Puget Sound from the Emerald City of Seattle.

View from Russell Investments Seattle Headquarters, stunning!

View from Russell Investments Seattle Headquarters, stunning!

Then a fitting image, from the business meeting floor of the same building, the settings sun for my departure.

Overlooking the Puget Sound, Japanese Garden in the forefront from the Russell Investments Building in Seattle.

Overlooking the Puget Sound, Japanese Garden in the forefront from the Russell Investments Building in Seattle.

February of 2012 kicked of with my return to Portland, Oregon. Stumptown regularly welcomed me back more than a few moments.

Stumptown Morning Brew

Stumptown Morning Brew

One of the first meetups I attended back in Portland was the DevOps Meetup.

DevOps DevOpers Hanging around pre-meeting at PuppetLabs in Portland.

DevOps DevOpers Hanging around pre-meeting at PuppetLabs in Portland.

That DevOps meetup just happened to have a session on one of the code bases I was working with, Cloud Foundry.

Cloud Foundry preso on how the pull requests and such where going to be built into a process, which still today is rather cumbersome for community involvement. However, it's still moving forward, albeit at a slower pace than it could if it was streamlined around github instead of github being an

Cloud Foundry preso on how the pull requests and such where going to be built into a process, which still today is rather cumbersome for community involvement. However, it’s still moving forward, albeit at a slower pace than it could if it was streamlined around github instead of github being an “end point” read only repository…

While my move consisted of many a couch, as I just couch surfed for the first 45 or so days I was back in Portland, I finally moved into a place at the Indigo in downtown.

My New Place, priorities as they are my system sits in the corner ready for use.

My New Place, priorities as they are my system sits in the corner ready for use.

The new system, albeit a great Christmas present from 2011, became the defacto work system of 2012 and remains one of my top machines. Mac Book Air w/ 4GB RAM, i5 Proc, 256 GB SSD. Not a bad machine.

2011 Mac Book Air, settled into it's workspace cradle.

2011 Mac Book Air, settled into it’s workspace cradle.

A view from on high, looking down upon the streets of San Francisco from the New Relic Offices. Thanks for the invite and the visit, it was great meeting the great team at New Relic San Francisco!

New Relic San Francisco View

New Relic San Francisco View

Getting around on my first trip to San Francisco of 2012. Thanks to John, Bjorn, Bill, John and the whole team in Portland and San Francisco for the invite. Great talking to you guys.

MUNI Streetcar FTW!

MUNI Streetcar FTW!

On the same trip it began pouring rain as I’d never seen before in San Francisco. I sat by Duboche Park, staying warm and away from drowning! Arriving outside was one of the MUNIs that eventually I was rescued by from the torrential floods and returned to downtown, dry and intact!

MUNI to the rescue on the torrential downpour of the year in San Francisco.

MUNI to the rescue on the torrential downpour of the year in San Francisco.

…and Julia thanks for the tour around San Francisco and the extra tasty lunch at EAT!! Good times!

Eating at the EAT sign!

Eating at the EAT sign!

Amidst all these images, I threw together some into a collage. There are a number of awesome coders & hackers of all sorts in these images. Shout out to Jerry Sievert, Eric Sterling,

Snikies, a collage I made!!!! (This one you can click on for a full size image)

Snikies, a collage I made!!!! (This one you can click on for a full size image)

…and alas I’ll have another zillion images and such as we all roll into 2013 and onward. Cheers! For some more new years posts I’ve found useful check out this list, which I’ll be adding to over the next few days.