Tag Archives: seattle

Machine Learning, Protocols, Classification, and Clustering

Today Suz Hinton @noopkat and Amanda Moran @AmandaDataStax are presenting, “Alternative Protocols – how offline machines can still talk to each other” and “Classification and Clustering Algorithms paired with Wine and Chocolate” respectively. The aim is to stream these talks tonight too on my Thrashing Code Twitch Channel. If you can attend in person, we’re almost at capacity so make sure you snag one of the remaining RSVP’s.

Here’s some more details on the speakers for tonight.

Continue reading

Geek Train from Seattle to Portland

April 12th-14th is the epic .NET Fringe Conference. For those coming from Seattle for the conference, there’s going to be a geek train, there however one major decision that needs to be made. What departure should we board to get to Portland. This is where I’ll need your help to decide. There will be a mini-hack, wifi, food, and likely we’ll actually get the entire car to ourselves with enough of a crew. So sign up, vote, vote often and frequently for your preferred departure time! I’ll see you on the train!

Along with the departure, the trip, events for the trip and more information will be posted on the .NET Fringe site soon, along with additional ideas here.

I’ve Officially Sent This Email Over 100 Times to Recruiters Looking for .NET Developers

Job Description

Here’s the letter, it’s kind of LOLz! I know it’s tough to find .NET Developers (or replace .NET with Java Developers or X Enterprise Language), so CIOs, CTOs and others take note. Here’s what I experience and what I see all the time, embodied in a letter. I will put effort into hooking people up with good jobs, that fit the person, and persons that fit the job, but lately I’ve seen companies that do .NET work in the Portland, Seattle and especially San Francisco areas become exceedingly desperate for .NET Developers. This is what my general response looks like.

“Hello Recruiter Looking for .NET Developer(s), thanks for reaching out to me, however I regret to inform you that I don’t know a single .NET Developer in Portland Oregon looking for work. It seems all the .NET Developers have either A: gone to work for Microsoft on Node.js Technologies, B: switched from being a .NET Developer to a Software Developer or otherwise C: left the field and don’t want to see any software ever again (which always makes me sad when people burn out, but alas, hopefully they find something they love). It’s a funny world we live in.

Even though I’m fairly well connected in Portland, Seattle, Vancouver (BC) and even San Francisco it is rare for me to meet someone who wants to do pure .NET Development. If there is I’ll connect them with you. However if you know a company that is porting away from .NET, building greenfield applications in Node.js, Ruby on Rails or other open source stacks I have a few software developers that might be interested.

Cheers”

Even though this letter is geared toward recruiters looking for coders, there is another letter that I’d like to write to a lot of other companies, that goes something like this,

“Dear Sir or Madam At X Corp Enterprise,

Please realize that lumping a person into the position you’re requesting (.NET Developer) is a career limiting maneuver for many in the occupation of software developers. We software developers are people who solve problems, it happens that we do this with code written on computers. The computers execute that code for us thus resolving the problems that you face. This helps X Corp Enterprise do business better! It’s a great relationship in many ways, but please don’t limit our future careers by mislabeling us.

Also, we’re not resources. That’s just a scummy thing for a human to call another human. Thanks for reading this letter, have a great day at X Corp Enterprise!”

I’d be happy to refer .NETters (or Javaers or COBOLers or RPGers or whatever), but seriously, it seems to be a lost cause out there, even more so for mid-level or beginning developers. Barely a soul is looking for a job as a .NET Developer, but I know a few that look for jobs as software developers every couple of weeks.

Speaking of which, if you are looking for work and you want a filtered list of the cool companies and related information of who to work for in Seattle, Portland or elsewhere in Cascadia reach out to me and let me know who you are. I’m more than happy to help you filter through the mine field of companies and job listings. Cheers!

Addendum:

Pluralsight Authors Summit – Meeting & Learning Really Talented People!

Finally, I’ve been able to wrap up my first blog entry on the Pluralsight Authors Summit 2014 (AS14)…

Classified

It all started with this. I’d received a mission.

NOTE: Click on any image to see the full gallery of images I took at the conference. My apologies for the dirty iPhone 5 camera lens.

I’ve been creating Pluralsight courses for a while now, with two to my name; Riak Fundamentals and Docker Fundamentals. I’ve got others in the works, and a lot of great suggestions that I’ll be blogging about in the very near future. However this weekend I headed to Salt Lake City for the Pluralsight Authors Summit.

I arrived at the airport, a 3 minute walk out and onto the light rail to downtown. I ranted via Twitter on my layover at the mess that SEATAC (Seattle & Tacoma’s Airport) is. Salt Lake City makes SEATAC look like an engineering catastrophe. So it was really nice to land in SLC and be able to walk right onto the train into town.

…that led into my admitted love for Seattle, I can’t harsh too bad on the emerald beauty…

Immediately upon leaving the airport it did seem a bit like I’d entered Mordor. Looking into the far distance the sky almost burned a brownish red and seemed to have endless darkness as far as I could see. With a twisting cloud or fog structure pushing down upon the southern view from the airport.

Ok, ok. It actually looked like this. But really, check that out, it’s kind of wild looking!

Along the way it cleared up and there were some amazing views to see of the mountains in the distance. It doesn’t really matter which way you look, you’ll see amazing vistas all around.

I rolled on into town and got to see a bit of downtown as the light rail rolled through town. It seems that Salt Lake City has a lot of bike lanes and related things, albeit I didn’t see any bicyclists anywhere. Overall what I could accrue was the city was extremely clean, well kept and the people – which I got to experience the rush hour while coming into town – were calm and chill as I often expect west coast cities to be.

I then got off at Little America Hotel where the conference was taking place. I couldn’t have asked for an easier ride, with the front door of the hotel being barely across the street from the light rail stop. I figured out my room, headed to check in and got some cool swag, then off to drop all my pack off at the room.

Once I rolled back into the main summit conference center I introduced myself to several people and got my photo taken. Somewhere, at some point, you’ll be exposed to my crazy mug somewhere again. I’ve warned you.

I talked camera and video gear with Phil Hunter. Phil has just started working at Pluralsight and is getting some great work put together for them.

After a bit of talking and introductions to new people, we all rounded up and sat down for dinner that evening. It wasn’t just dinner though, there was gambling setup with prizes and more. That unto itself was pretty cool, but being the non-gambling person that I am, I went straight to the food. Which I gotta say was really good! I even got to experience two glassholes (Jim Wilson @hedgehogjim | Jim’s Author Page and Llewellyn Falco @LlewellynFalco | Llewellyn’s Author Page who are excellent crew) try to setup some magic pixie dust unicorn trick with their Google Glasses.

Jon, Shannon, Julie and all of us we sat helplessly while they configured the glasses to do… well I don’t think we ever figured it out really. But a great table to sit at. We had a good dinner. I wrapped up and others went to gamble while I went to get some recovery sleep.

Saturday

Saturday kicked off a set of talks:

  • Key Note: Aaron Skonnard @skonnard CEO of Pluralsight – great to get the big picture and see where the company is headed.
  • Curriculum Overview & Future Direction – Fritz Onion @fritzonion & team dove into specifics of how we’ll grow offerings to bring more courses and material to subscribers in the coming year, making it easier to find, search for and use.
  • Continuous Improvement & Creating Compelling Technical Content with Geoffrey Grosenbach @topfunky.

Another great lunch was served, conversations were had and I got to introduce myself to even more great authors. After lunch I met Koffi Sessi @aksessi in person finally and we discussed courses, ways to improve and put together even better content and a host of other topics. We wrapped up with a promise he’d send me some of the music he listens to. Being we both of some really esoteric genres I’m looking forward to what he sends me.

After that I got to check out Video Workflow with Shawn Wildermuth @ShawnWildermuth and Authoring and Time Management with the Dane Down Under Lars Klint @larsklint. After dinner the evening wrapped up with X Things You Didn’t Know You Could Do With Your Blog by Chris Reynolds @jazzs3quence and Tips on Using Windows Azure to Host VMs for Recording Pluralsight Demos by Orin Thomas @orinthomas | Orin’s Author Page.

It’s Happening Again, Seattle Code Camp!

I’ve got two presentations happening this year at Seattle Code Camp! Are you signed up? If not, hit this and get signed up ASAP:  https://seattlecodecamp2013.eventbrite.com/

My two presentations are:

Distributed Databases – An Introduction to Riak

Presenter:Adron Hall

I’ll dive in with a quick definition and context of what distributed databases are. From there we’ll quickly move into what Riak is, how its architecture lends it toward being one of the premier distributed database solutions on the market today. We’ll take a walk through vector clocks to consistent hashs, clusters and rings managing the world of the distributed systems. Then we’ll dive into a use case with a put and pull of data from a walkthrough implementation of Riak.

…and…

Developer Workflow: From Angular.js, Riak, Testing and Vagrant Dev Environments

Presenter:Adron Hall

Each developer has to come up with a workflow that works well for them. Sometimes a lot of the workflow is dictated but there is still a lot that’s left up to the individual. With many modern tools you have a selection of everything from text editor, to IDE to actual operating system distribution. In this presentation I’m going to walk through some of the tooling to help keep all of these things under control during the course of programming efforts. …and yes, this will go beyond just the IDE (or text editor, etc)

…and others to check out!

Much Ado About Hadoop

By now you’ve heard the words “Big Data” and “Hadoop”, but you’re not sure what they mean, much less how to get started. You’re struggling with storing a lot of data, rapidly processing a huge volume of data, or maybe you’re just curious. There are a bewildering array of options and use cases within the Hadoop ecosystem. Every day I help customers understand their data problems, understand where Hadoop fits into their environment, and determine how they can use Hadoop to solve their problem. This session provides an introduction to what Hadoop is, when it’s appropriate to use Hadoop, and guidance on how to get started.

Unit Testing Web Development

Presenter:Mark Michaelis

When it comes to testing, Web Development is fraught with challenges whether it be from variations in browser behavior, the lack of compilation on JavaScript, or the traditional coupling between the UI and the code. In this session we walk through the complexities surrounding the testing of web projects and cover how to overcome these. This includes leveraging everything from source code analysis and JavaScript unit testing to UI and performance testing. Don’t miss this session to learn a multitude ways to significantly improve the quality of your web development.

Riak in a .NET World

Developers have a lot of choices when it comes to storing data. In this session, we’ll introduce .NET developers to Riak, a distributed key-value database. Through a combination of concepts and practical examples, attendees will learn when Riak might be appropriate, how to get started with Riak using CorrugatedIron (a full-featured .NET client for Riak), and how to solve data modeling problems they’re likely to encounter. This talk is for developers who are interested in backing their applications with a fault-tolerant, distributed database.

Introduction to Ember.js

Presenter:Jon Cortez

Ember.js is an open-source client-side JavaScript web application framework based on the Model-View-Controller (MVC) software architectural pattern. It is designed to help developers build scalable Single Page Applications (SPAs) by incorporating common idioms and best practices into a framework that provides a rich object model, declarative two-way data binding, computed properties, automatically-updating templates, and a router for managing application state. In this session, you will learn the key concepts of Ember.js and how to use it to create a simple Single Page Application.

Think Like a Dev: Cognitive Pitfalls in Software Development

Presenter:Michael Ibarra

Our own minds are often working against us. What makes estimating so hard? Is there real value in planning poker? How effective are weekly retrospectives, really? Let’s explore how our minds may be working against us in ways we might not realize. We’ll examine the sources of some common cognitive biases, how they apply to our work efforts, and discuss some “strategery” for overcoming them.

Building a Server Appliance in Node.js

Presenter:Eugenio Pace

Auth0 is a server/service to drastically simplify authentication, identity federation & SSO scenarios; for web & mobile apps. It’s our first big project on node. One of the reasons we decided to build it entirely on node, is the ability to package it and deploy it anywhere: as a service in the public cloud, as a virtual appliance on private cloud, or as an appliance on-premises. In this session we’ll show how we built it. How we use JS for extensibility and easy customization. What worked well, what didn’t. Tools we used, etc.

Hope to see you there. Cheers!

My Year of Coding, Messaging, Learning, Leading, Reconoitering, and Hacking in Photos

Hope you have a little patience, this blog entry is going to be pretty long. There was a multitude of conferences, more than a hundred pair coding sessions, more cities, hotels and other things as I criss crossed the country helping to knock out projects, code, fire off some open source projects and generally get some technology implemented. It has been a spectacular year. I also could add, it has thoroughly kicked my ass and I’ve loved it.

2012 Coding Projects

In 2012 I’ve taken the healm of the Iron Foundry Project which led to the creation of Tier 3 Web Fabric PaaS. A Cloud Foundry & Iron Foundry .NET based PaaS. From there the project led to an expansion of leading the efforts on the Thor Project, which is a Cloud Foundry User Interface for OS-X and Windows 7. Beyond that I’ve contributed to and participated in dozens of different projects in various ways over the year. I finished up this year by joining Basho in December and thus, joined the Riak & related Basho Projects.

Coding Project Aims For 2013

Some of the projects I’ve started, will join or hope to otherwise continue participation in include the following. Here’s to hoping 2013 is a hard core coding and contributing year of excellence!

  • Many of the Basho Organization’s Projects I’ll be diving into, including work around Rebar, Riak, Docs & a number of others.
  • Name Factory – a project I’ve started a while back of Riak + JavaScript around creating massive test data with JavaScript and also using Riak for the storage & searching on that data created.
  • Criollo – Criollo is one of the most common forms of cocoa, is a native OS-X Cocoa User Interface for distributed systems built on or using Riak.
  • SpikeOp – This I’ve dubbed the name of the iOS interface for distributed systems built on or using Riak.
  • I want to use and possibly contribute to Corrugated Iron, the .NET Client for Riak. Prospectively to use for a Windows 8 User Interface for distributed systems built on or using Riak.
  • I’ll continue to maintain and provide support for the Iron Foundry vcap-client Library currently available via Nuget for .NET.
  • Thor Project for Cocoa & Thor .NET for Cloud Foundry & Iron Foundry.
  • Expand on prospective services for Cloud Foundry, either I or efforts I may lead to do this.

…there are others, but they’ll have to be figured out during the course of events. Also, there are an easy dozen other projects I’ll be working that don’t particularly have to do with coding, two are listed below. For an easy way to keep up with the projects I’m coding on, leading, participating in or otherwise hit me up on Twitter @adron or ADN @adron.

Big Project Aims for 2013

Thrashing Code Project – This is sort of, kind of secret. It’s going to happen soon, I have a personal schedule for it and I’ll be releasing information accordingly when the site and twitter account goes live.

Tour Triumvirate – I intend to plan, and hopefully will take at least 2 of the three tech tours I setup. More information will be forthcoming, but the original notion is outlined in the blog entry I wrote titled “The Adron Code Tour, Let’s Hack, Bike and Talk Hard Core Technology“.

Books I’ve Read in 2012

All of these I’ve either read or re-read in 2012. I set a goal at the beginning of last year to get my ass in gear when it comes to reading. A focused, get it read, understood and learn approach. I think I did pretty good overall. Not a book a week, but I’m getting back in gear. Considering my best year of reading was 100+ books, it might be a difficult to reach that again since I’m a working citizen, versus a child with plenty of time on their hands. But, it’s good to have goals.  😉

  • The Clean Coder: A Code of Conduct for Professional Programmers
  • The Rails 3 Way
  • Eloquent Ruby
  • The Economics of Freedom: What Your Professors Won’t Tell You, Selected Works of Frederic Bastiat
  • The Myth of the Robber Barons
  • Excellence Without a Soul: Does Liberal Education Have a Future?
  • Seven Databases in Seven Weeks: A Guide to Modern Databases and the NoSQL Movement
  • Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman!
  • The Innovator’s Dilemma: The Revolutionary Book That Will Change the Way You Do Business
  • The Lean Startup: How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses
  • 8 Things We Hate About IT: How to Move Beyond the Frustrations to Form a New Partnership with IT
  • Smart and Gets Things Done: Joel Spolsky’s Concise Guide to Finding the Best Technical Talent
  • Rework
  • Steve Jobs
  • Eloquent JavaScript: A Modern Introduction to Programming
  • JavaScript: The Good Parts
  • Node for Front-End Developers
  • First Contact (In Her Name: The Last War, #1)
  • Cloudonomics: The Business Value of Cloud Computing
  • The REST API Design Handbook
  • HTML5 Canvas
  • HTML5: Up and Running
  • Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier
  • Traffic

Book Reading Aims for 2013

  • Natural Capitalism
  • How God Changes Your Brain: Breakthrough Findings from a Leading Neuroscientist
  • Discourse on the Method of Rightly Conducting One’s Reason and of Seeking Truth in the Sciences
  • Political Ideals
  • The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
  • Wrestling with Moses: How Jane Jacobs Took On New York’s Master Builder and Transformed the American City
  • Bikenomics: An Introduction to the Bicycle Economy
  • Everyday Bicycling: How to Ride a Bike for Transportation (Whatever Your Lifestyle)
  • Just Ride: A Radically Practical Guide to Riding Your Bike
  • Continuous Delivery: Reliable Software Releases through Build, Test, and Deployment Automation
  • Erlang Programming
  • Building Web Applications with Erlang: Working with REST and Web Sockets on Yaws
  • Think Complexity: Complexity Science and Computational Modeling
  • Async JavaScript
  • Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere (Smashing Magazine Book Series)
  • Windows PowerShell for Developers
  • How to Use the Unix-Linux vi Text Editor
  • Sketching User Experiences: The Workbook
  • Designing Interfaces
  • Information Architecture for the World Wide Web: Designing Large-Scale Web Sites
  • Consider Phlebas
  • Snow Crash
  • How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas
  • Mission, Inc.: The Practitioner’s Guide to Social Enterprise
  • Simply Complexity
  • Complex Adaptive Systems: An Introduction to Computational Models of Social Life (Princeton Studies in Complexity)
  • Thinking In Systems: A Primer
  • Thinking, Fast and Slow
  • Programming in Objective-C
  • Learning iPad Programming: A Hands-on Guide to Building iPad Apps with iOS 5
  • Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X
  • Getting Started with GEO, CouchDB, and Node.js
  • JavaScript Web Applications
  • Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream
  • Design Patterns in Ruby

…and the two books I’d like to re-read this year because they’re just absurdly entertaining and I’d like a refresher of the stories.

  • A Confederacy of Dunces (I’ll be reading this for the 2nd time)
  • The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (Yup, just want to read it again)

My 2012 Coder’s Year in Photos

What I’ve put together here is a photo story of the year, hopefully it’s entertaining in some way. With that, here’s a review of the year, cheers and happy new year! 2012 started with one of my last hack sessions as a Seattle Resident at Ruby at Racer weekly meetup.

Ruby at Racer Meetup

Ruby at Racer Meetup

Meanwhile some of my last views from Russell Investments. Absolutely beautiful, epic and awe inspiring views of the Puget Sound from the Emerald City of Seattle.

View from Russell Investments Seattle Headquarters, stunning!

View from Russell Investments Seattle Headquarters, stunning!

Then a fitting image, from the business meeting floor of the same building, the settings sun for my departure.

Overlooking the Puget Sound, Japanese Garden in the forefront from the Russell Investments Building in Seattle.

Overlooking the Puget Sound, Japanese Garden in the forefront from the Russell Investments Building in Seattle.

February of 2012 kicked of with my return to Portland, Oregon. Stumptown regularly welcomed me back more than a few moments.

Stumptown Morning Brew

Stumptown Morning Brew

One of the first meetups I attended back in Portland was the DevOps Meetup.

DevOps DevOpers Hanging around pre-meeting at PuppetLabs in Portland.

DevOps DevOpers Hanging around pre-meeting at PuppetLabs in Portland.

That DevOps meetup just happened to have a session on one of the code bases I was working with, Cloud Foundry.

Cloud Foundry preso on how the pull requests and such where going to be built into a process, which still today is rather cumbersome for community involvement. However, it's still moving forward, albeit at a slower pace than it could if it was streamlined around github instead of github being an

Cloud Foundry preso on how the pull requests and such where going to be built into a process, which still today is rather cumbersome for community involvement. However, it’s still moving forward, albeit at a slower pace than it could if it was streamlined around github instead of github being an “end point” read only repository…

While my move consisted of many a couch, as I just couch surfed for the first 45 or so days I was back in Portland, I finally moved into a place at the Indigo in downtown.

My New Place, priorities as they are my system sits in the corner ready for use.

My New Place, priorities as they are my system sits in the corner ready for use.

The new system, albeit a great Christmas present from 2011, became the defacto work system of 2012 and remains one of my top machines. Mac Book Air w/ 4GB RAM, i5 Proc, 256 GB SSD. Not a bad machine.

2011 Mac Book Air, settled into it's workspace cradle.

2011 Mac Book Air, settled into it’s workspace cradle.

A view from on high, looking down upon the streets of San Francisco from the New Relic Offices. Thanks for the invite and the visit, it was great meeting the great team at New Relic San Francisco!

New Relic San Francisco View

New Relic San Francisco View

Getting around on my first trip to San Francisco of 2012. Thanks to John, Bjorn, Bill, John and the whole team in Portland and San Francisco for the invite. Great talking to you guys.

MUNI Streetcar FTW!

MUNI Streetcar FTW!

On the same trip it began pouring rain as I’d never seen before in San Francisco. I sat by Duboche Park, staying warm and away from drowning! Arriving outside was one of the MUNIs that eventually I was rescued by from the torrential floods and returned to downtown, dry and intact!

MUNI to the rescue on the torrential downpour of the year in San Francisco.

MUNI to the rescue on the torrential downpour of the year in San Francisco.

…and Julia thanks for the tour around San Francisco and the extra tasty lunch at EAT!! Good times!

Eating at the EAT sign!

Eating at the EAT sign!

Amidst all these images, I threw together some into a collage. There are a number of awesome coders & hackers of all sorts in these images. Shout out to Jerry Sievert, Eric Sterling,

Snikies, a collage I made!!!! (This one you can click on for a full size image)

Snikies, a collage I made!!!! (This one you can click on for a full size image)

…and alas I’ll have another zillion images and such as we all roll into 2013 and onward. Cheers! For some more new years posts I’ve found useful check out this list, which I’ll be adding to over the next few days.

Seattle Code Camp – A Summary

Wow… that was great.

I had three presentations. Well, honestly it was more like two presentations and a brainstorming session with about 3 dozen really smart people!

First there was the “Node.js Rulz! JavaScript takes over the full stack“. This session went pretty well, and I hope I got a lot of developers riled up to give Node.js a try. I discussed the various testing, framework, and other libraries needed to get going with development. I also did a test deployment against Tier 3’s Web Fabric PaaS (Cloud Foundry powered AWESOME). If you want to try out this deployment model, a sand box is available for free over at the Iron Foundry Project (.NET extensions for Cloud Foundry). Just sign up and we’ll get you added ASAP.

In summary, I went end to end with Node.js. Overall, it’s a beautiful thing that I highly suggest people give a thorough look at.

The next session I did was “Removing the Operating System Barrier with Platform as a Service“. This session covers my primary live of wrok and advocacy these days. It involves a key facet of software development that I’ve dubbed the “Beer Factor”. More on the “Beer Factor” later.  🙂

In this session I covered the history, reasons for, and overall impetus of PaaS (Platform as a Service) and why it matters to software developers. The general gist is, it is changing the very way we can and will be doing software development. The change, is absolutely for the better. Developers, consider yourself empowered. Also, more on this in the near future.

The last sessions, which was more of a large scale brain storming session, was “Putting it all together, letting apps lead the cycle, TDD in the cloud“. This session really kicked off a lot of different thoughts around the MAJOR gaps in cloud computing development. So I’m going to break out some of those key points below:

  • There is no logical, easy, or well defined way to test deployments to the cloud. If you’re AWS, Rackspace, Windows Azure, Tier 3, AppFog or any other company – deployment is not simple. A big impetus is to test production, something that absolutely has to be done. The gateways or checks in deploying software; for the underlying infrastructure, the platform, or anything that is geographically dispersed, multi-instance, or similar is very difficult. For software developers, devops, and the like, we want this to be better. We all brainstormed a bit around this and the resounding sentiment was, “damn, this is hard, yet so powerful and enabling that we have to figure out better ways to test and do deployments into cloud environments”
  • Chaos Monkey must bet let loose on the WORLD!!  See below:

    @adrianco chances of open sourcing Chaos Monkey? Room full of Cloud Devs want, egged on by @adron#seattlecodecamp

    @iC@adron it’s on the way, actively being cleaned up for github

    Adrian Cockroft RULZ! Thx Adrian, we’ll all keep an eye out for that! 🙂

  • One of the other things that was brought up was the endless options, and thus complexity, around the data story these days. This translates to, how do we simplify deployment of relational, document, object, key value or other types of databases? Each needs a particular type of default deployment. How do we as developers create a better model to get our data repositories of choice up and live. With Cloud Foundry the data deployments are a single node, which isn’t really useful for things like Riak, Mongo, Couch or databases that need to start with three or more nodes. It’s ok for relational databases, but it is very common to need that hot swappable database running somewhere. These are all questions that need answered to make the data story of PaaS technologies more palatable.
  • Monitoring and intelligent systems. Some suggestions around monitoring, which came from the question of how to test a deployed system before and after deployment, where pretty solid. Nodes need to be intelligent enough to be able to identify they’re live, active, and doing X, Y or Z. Controllers need to understand and know how to interact with these nodes. The back and forth is somewhat complex, but I can imagine just like with Cloud Foundry, they’re is a viable and simple solution among all of this with the appropriate abstractions and build out of systems.

That’s my summary. I had a blast, got to see a lot of people I know and meet a lot of new people I didn’t know. I always love being able to catch up and really expand on what our efforts are individually and collectively as a development community. Great fun, until next time, cheers!