After 816 Days I’m Taking a Job!

The new mission, or as some may call it, a job! The context for those that might not be familiar with my adventures is that I’ve been working independently as a consultant, contractor, community builder, beer drinker, hacker, teacher, trainer, mentor, curriculum builder, and training content creator. The last time I held something that resembled a job was 560 business days ago, or more specifically 816 days ago. Honestly, I’m not even sure that it could be considered a job, it was a strange gig to say the least. Recently after this long break I’m taking up a new job position with some interesting objectives and priorities.

Here’s some of what I wrote to outline the specific objectives and priorities for the new team I’m joining and to insure I had clear priorities for myself. I do, after all, prize clear objectives very high on the “things that are useful & cool” list.

Objectives

  • Community Contributions – Help launch and build the community around the release of a yet to be announced open source micro-services framework (we’re currently calling it the Forge Framework) following an open source software model. I’ll also be telling you about all the work that has gone into this framework so far form Jesse, Beau, and the team. This will cover their various battles, from discussions to decisions, all leading up to the release of the framework. At this point, our time frame to release this is somewhere around the Feburary time frame. Currently it is in production, but we will need to make sure we have a reason repository of code we can release. We’re aiming for it to be in good shape for everybody to use when it’s released. (I’ll be managing the overall effort, so ping me if you’re interested in jumping into the project)
  • Site Reliability – Help build infrastructure for site reliability, deployment, etc (immutable, container based, etc) to deliver the company’s key products, APIs, micro-services, and improve the back-end deployment and delivery options and capabilities. This is going to include a lot of cool technology including things like Docker, kafka, CoreCLR, and a host of other things that I’ll be blogging about on a regular basis. Along with this infrastructure and site reliability I’ll help set guidelines, approaches, and future objectives for delivery and deployment of software. When I implement things, I’ll aim to blog it, when I learn new tips and tricks, I’ll aim to blog it, and whenever I break a build, I’ll blog that too. Whatever it is, I’m aiming to increase my frequency a great deal in the coming days, weeks, and months.
  • Talent Recon – I’m looking for, scouting around like force recon, and connecting talent to future work we will be having come open in early 2016. (Again, this is where I get to come and hack with you, help build awesome open source software, and let you my fellow coding cohort know about the company’s existing and upcoming awesome work we’ll be hiring for! For those that know me, you know I’m serious about making sure I line up the right people with the right types of gigs, I’m no recruiter, I’m a coder, so I fight against wildly innappropriate misalignment and related silliness!)

These are my top priorities as I step into this role with the Quote Center, a kind of laboratory of inventive ideas for Home Depot. You’ll be hearing a lot more about this in the coming days, and if you’re interested in working with me and an awesome group of people – reach out and let me know @Adron on Twitter or just email me. Cheers!

Back From Scandinavia, Back to Project Coding, Writing and Organizing

vikingI just got back from Scandinavia (and Amsterdam). I went for a million reasons, mostly for the adventure of it. Visiting Stockholm, Copenhagen and Reykjavik I saw about a zillion bikes, great architecture, Tivoli, amazing and beautiful waterways, Viking boat building museums, design to die for and so much more. It’s truly one of the amazing areas of the world. But now I’m back in ‘Merica and ready to get back to working on projects, design efforts and all the things I love to do. This blog post is a summary of my immediate return to projects, here’s the list broken into coding, writing and organizing:

Coding

  • Deconstructed – [site] This is the startup I’ve cofounded with Aaron Gray @agray. Check out our main site at Deconstructed. Check out some of the open source projects we’ve started here and listed below.
  • Deconstructed Docs – [site] [JavaScript] [Node.js] I’m using Wintersmith to build docs with static site generation. The docs are located at docs.deconstructed.io. Previous blog entries I did on building a static site with Wintersmith are available at Wintersmith Creating Documentation and Working in -34c, Wintersmith Customization & Github Hosting.
  • Symphonize.js – [site] [JavaScript] [Node.js] [issues] This is a project I started to use configuration as a basis for creating data for any database, but specifically Orchestrate (see blog entries under the writing section I did for Orchestrate). The idea behind this started since I needed something to generate test data for Deconstructed. This one is incomplete, but I’ll be pushing it forward to a deployable NPM Module soon that will be easy to download and just use. There’s also a possibility that this becomes a service that I make available in the near future.
  • Orchestrate.NET – [site] [c#] [issues] I’ve been helping out Robert Smith and a crew to manage the effort around the .NET client driver for Orchestrate. This is currently functional and we’d love anybody and everybody using it to really test it out. Currently I’m using this for the OrchestrateExecute Project listed below too.
  • orchestrate-rapping – [repo] [go] [issues] [group] Yo yo yo, hit the beat. This is an effort that I and others have kicked off to put together a wrapper for Orchestrate’s API. The reason is simple, we want to be able to develop sitting far away from wifi and connectivity, in a park or a cabin in the woods, with a beer in hand and a fire crackling. All while knowing we’re building something that will work when we reconnect to the land of the internet!
  • OrchestrateExecutive – [repo] [c#] [issues] For a very serious enterprise application, I’ve started hacking together a C# Application using Xamarin that will provide a library tier (that could be used as a sample) to use in building to Android, iOS or Windows Phone and all of the native Windows, Linux or OS-X apps that might be needed. In the application I’ll be using Orchestrate and Deconstructed to build out the application. Stay tuned at blog.deconstructed.io for more on this.
  • …and also inspired by Rick Turoczy @turoczy eternally another fucking side project will be going live soon. 😮

Writing

Organizing

  • Bike n’ Hack – Follow @bikenhack for information and more coming soon.
  • Node PDX – More to come on this soon.

…subscribe to the RSS link, hit the e-mail subscription or just ping me or follow me @adron on Twitter and I’ll keep you posted on the goings on of all my efforts and others. Cheers!

In-memory Orchestrate Local Development Database

I was talking with Tory Adams @BEZEI2K about working with Orchestrate‘s Services. We’re totally sold on what they offer and are looking forward to a lot of the technology that is in the works. The day to day building against Orchestrate is super easy, and setting up collections for dev or test or whatever are so easy nothing has stood in our way. Except one thing…

Every once in a while we have to work disconnected. For whatever the reason might be; Comcast cable goes out, we decide to jump on a train or one of us ends up on one of those Q400 puddle jumpers that doesn’t have wifi! But regardless of being disconnected from wifi, cable or internet connectivity we still want to be able to code and test!

In Memory Orchestrate Wrapper

Enter the idea of creating an in memory Orchestrate database wrapper. Using something like convict.js one could easily redirect all the connections as necessary when developing locally. That way development continues right along and when the application is pushed live, it’s redirected to the appropriate Orchestrate connections and keys!

This in memory “fake” or “mock” would need to have the key value, events, and graph store setup just like Orchestrate. With the possibility of having this in memory one could also easily write tests against a real fake and be able to test connected or disconnected without mocking. Not to say that’s a good or bad idea, but just one more tool in the tool chest doesn’t hurt!

If something like this doesn’t pop up in the next week or three, I might just have to kick off this project myself! If anybody is interested please reach out to me and let’s discuss! I’m open to writing it in JavaScript, C#, Java or whatever poison pill you’d prefer. (I’m not polyglot to limit my options!!)

Other Ideas, Development Shop Swap

Another idea that I’ve been pondering is setting up a development shop swap. I’ll leave the reader to determine what that means!  😉  Feel free to throw down ideas that this might bring up and I’ll incorporate that into the soon to be implementation. I’ll have more information about that idea right here once the project gets rolling. In the meantime, happy coding!

I’ve Got a JavaScript & Node.js Webinar, Webstorm Tutorial Videos, Work & Flow With JavaScript Development and More…

Webinar: Node.js Development Workflow in WebStorm

This coming week I’m doing an intro to work and flow with Node.js JavaScript Programming that I’m working with JetBrains on. In the webinar I’ll be covering the following key topics in the webinar:

  • Open an existing project & getting WebStorm configured for running, testing and related working tasks.
  • A quick tour of other IDE features that help with daily work. Some in pretty huge ways.
  • Running WebStorm & debugging Node.js JavaScript applications.
  • Checking out Mocha, how it works and what it gives WebStorm the power to do. Then we’ll write a few tests & implement that code too.

All this will include Q & A throughout and at the end of the webinar. Be sure to register soon!

WebStorm Tutorials: Learning Shortcuts, Customizing Layout and Others

These WebStorm Tutorials have been put together by John Lindquist @johnlindquist for JetBrains. There solid, quick snippets of useful WebStorm usage. Two that I’ve found really useful I’ve included here:

John also has a lot of other great totally kick ass material out there. So check out his blog @ http://johnlindquist.com/ and follow his youtube channel too.

Coming Up in the Near Future, The Work & Flow of JavaScript Development

I have a new course I’m working on right now for Pluralsight, that will take these basic precepts and dive even deeper into the daily workflow of the JavaScript Developer. Whether it’s client side hacking or server side coding, I’ll be diving into a whole lot of JavaScript goodness. If you’d like me to ping you when the course is done, hit me up on Twitter @adron and just let me know. In the meantime get a Pluralsight subscription (free to sign up and at least give it a try) and check out these courses by myself and others.

Docker Course, Ubuntu, WordPress, Angular.js, Notes, Rich Hickey, Datomic…

Updates, updates, updates…

Docker Course @ Pluralsight

I added a new course on Docker to my Pluralsight list of courses today. This joins my one other course on Riak, which I’m aiming to have more added to that list in the future! Check those out and let me know what you think, how I could improve, what I did right and what you learned (or already knew). I’d greatly appreciate it!

Rich Hickey, Datomic, Clojure, Angular.js and Notes

I started a section on the blog here for notes on topics I’m studying. The first two I’ve hit on are Angular.js and Rich Hickey, Clojure and Hammock Driven Development. I’ll be adding to these over time and will likely report whenever I add good chunks of info or helpful tutorials, how-to docs or just whatever I deem worth mentioning. Simply put I won’t broadcast it much, unless I add some real goodies that are worth it.  😉

Ubuntu & WordPress

I needed a kind of WordPress Workstation to hack around testing some WordPress so I put together quick notes on the fastest and cleanest way to setup a WordPress VM from scratch.

Until later, happy coding, have a metal \m/ \m/ Friday!