7 Tips for Creating Technical Content on The Open Source Show

I’m in a video with the rad Christina Warren!

In this video we walk about 7 tips for creating technical content in a kind of rapid fire back and forth of ideas. Recording this was great, as the way we did it presented us with a chance to put these ideas together like this. Being that both of us have presented and helped people out presenting a few more times then we’ve been able to keep a count of, the crew leading this endeavor basically said, “start brainstorming” as if the show is live. We did that, and it worked rather well. Then the artists, animators, and crew went to work splicing and dicing the video into this watchable format! Lotsa fun, enjoy.

For each of these I’ve elaborated on in the past.

Those 7 Tips for Creating Technical Content

  1. Always be learning!
  2. Know your audience.
  3. Bring ALL the connectors.
  4. Backup, backup, backup your presentations.
  5. Write continuously, regularly, and tell yourself a story.
  6. Try tutorials on a fresh machine.
  7. Observe how people create and present content.

Even more details on all these in the future.

References:

 

 

Top 4: “Nobody Reads Blogs… Except Everybody Read Blogs”

I know I know, the marketers say it’s all about the single articles now. Nobody reads blogs. Nobody subscribes to blogs. Ya know, except of course for that small percentage of people that do.

…marketing, it’ll make you insane if you’re not careful.

But seriously, here’s a few blogs that are actually worth reading. They’re worth subscribing to and surprisingly, they’re blogs that businesses organize and write. Yes, I have and might be writing for some of them in the future. But I’m honestly basing this list on a few specific criteria:

  • The blog has to include some technical content that is important to getting kick started with their product and getting kick started with other tooling around their space.
  • The blog has to include articles that have industry information that is relevant to conferences, meetups, and other community related activities.

Here’s my list of reads lately:

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