Category Archives: Coding Adventures

Chapter 2 in My Twitch Streaming

A while back I started down the path of getting a Twitch Channel started. At this point I’ve gotten a channel setup which I’ve dubbed Thrashing Code albeit it still just has “adronhall” all over it. I’ll get those details further refined as I work on it more.

Today I recorded a new Twitch stream about doing a twitch stream and created an edited video of all the pieces and cameras and angles. I could prospectively help people get started, it’s just my experiences so far and efforts to get everything connected right. The actual video stream recording is available, and I’ll leave it on the channel. However the video I edited will be available and I’ll post a link here.

Tomorrow will be my first official Twitch stream at 3pm PST. If you’re interested in watching check out my Twitch profile here follow and it’ll ping you when I go live. This first streaming session, or episode, or whatever you want to call it, will include a couple topics. I’ll be approaching these topics from that of someone just starting, so if you join help hold me to that! Don’t let me skip ahead or if you notice I left out something key please join and chat at me during the process. I want to make sure I’m covering all the bases as I step through toward achieving the key objectives. Which speaking of…

Tomorrow’s Mission Objectives

  1. Create a DataStax Enterprise Cassandra Cluster in Google Cloud Platform.
  2. Create a .NET project using the latest cross-platform magical bits that will have a library for abstracting the data source(s), a console interface for using the application, and of course a test project.
  3. Configure & connect to the distributed database cluster.

Mission Stretch Objectives

  1. Start a github repo to share the project with others.
  2. Setup some .github templates for feature request issues or related issues.
  3. Write up some Github Issue Feature requests and maybe even sdd some extra features to the CLI for…??? no idea ??? determine 2-3 during the Twitch stream.

If you’d like to follow along, here’s what I have installed. You’re welcome to a range of tooling to follow along with that is the same as what I’ve got here or a variance of other things. Feel free to bring up tooling if you’re curious about it via chat and I’ll answer questions where and when I can.

  • Ubuntu v18.04
  • .NET core v2.1
  • DataStax Enterprise v6

Quick San Francisco Trip, Multi-Cloud Conversations, and A Network of Excellent People to Follow

A Quick Trip

Boarded the 17x King County Metro Bus at 6:11am yesterday. The trip was entirely uneventful until we arrived in Belltown in downtown Seattle. A guy with only his underwear on boarded the bus. Yup, you got that right, just like those underwear nightmares people have! That guy was living this situation for whatever unknown reasons. He didn’t make to much fuss though and eventually settled into one of the back seats on our packed bus.

Downtown as I got off I was pleasantly surprised that Victrola was open in the newly leased Amazon building near Pine & Pike on 3rd. I remember it being built and opening, but for some reason had completely forgotten it was there until today. Having a Victrola at this location sets it up perfectly for the mornings one needs to get to the airport. It’s located in a way that you can get off any connecting bus, grab an espresso at Victrola, and then enter the downtown tunnel to board LINK to the airport. Previously, the only option was really to wait until you get to the airport and buy some of the lackluster espresso coffee trash options they have at SEATAC.

Once I boarded the LINK I got into some notes for the upcoming Distributed Data Show that I would be recording while in San Francisco. But also got into a little review of some Node.js JavaScript code that I’d pulled down previously. I’ve been hard pressed to get into the code base and add some updates, logging, and minor logic for Killrvideo. Hopefully today, or maybe even this evening while I’m on the rest of this adventure.

All the things in between then occurred. The flight to San Jose, the oddball Taxi ride to Santa Clara DataStax HQ, then the Lyft ride to Caltrain to ride into downtown San Francisco to my hotel. Twas’ an excellently chill ride into the city and even a little productive. A good night of sleep and then up and at em’. Headed to the nearest Blue Bottle, which was on the way to my next effort of the trip. Blue Bottle was solid as always, and into the studios I went.

Multi-Cloud Conversations

At this point of this quick trip I’ve just finished shooting a few new episodes of the Distributed Data Show (subscribe) with Jeff Carpenter (@jscarp) and Amanda Moran (@amandadatastax). Just recently I also got to shoot an episode with Patrick McFadin (@patrickmcfadin) too. We’ve been enjoying a number of conversations around multi-cloud considerations, what going multi-cloud means, and even what exactly does multi-cloud even really mean. It’s been fun and now I’m putting together some additional blog posts and related material to follow the posts with more detail. So keep an eye out for the Distributed Data Shows. You can also take the lazy route and subscribe to be notified when new episodes are released or you could even set your calendar for every Tuesday, because we follow an old school traditional schedule approaches to episode releases.

I’ve included a recap on a few of the recent episodes below, which you may want to check out just to get an idea of what’s to come. Great as a listen while commuting, something to put on while you’re relaxing a bit but want to think about or listen to a conversation on a topic, or just curious what’s up!

In this last episode DataStax Vanguard Lead Chelsea Navo (@mazdagirluk) joined in to talk about how the team helps enterprises meet the challenges posed by disrupting technology and competitors. Some of the highlights of the conversation include:

1:57 Defining what exactly enterprise transformation is.

4:00 Trends including retooling batch workloads around real-time requirements, handing larger data sets and the uber popular use of streaming data we see today.

7:37 Techniques on getting teams trained up on cutting-edge technology.

9:46 There’s an argument for “skateboard solutions“! I now want to write up a whole practice around this!

16:27 Data modeling. Challenges of. Challenges around. Data modeling, it’s a good topic of exploration.

25:56 The data layer is still typically the hardest part of your application! (The assertion is made; agree, disagree, or ??)

Continue reading

Getting Started with Twitch | Twitch Thrashing Code Stream

I’d been meaning to get started for some time. I even tweeted, just trying to get further insight into what and why people watch Twitch streams and of course why and who produces their own Twitch streams.

With that I set out to figure out how to get the right tooling setup for Twitch streaming on Linux and MacOS. Here’s what I managed to dig up.

First things first, and somewhat obviously, go create a Twitch account. The sign up link is up in the top right corner.

https://www.twitch.tv/ Continue reading

A Day in The Life of http://adron.me

So I sat down and hacked up a new version of Adron.me. I snagged a site theme and skin from Theme Forest and ran with it. Broke apart each of a few sections to get a minimally viable site up within 24 hours. I got interrupted a few times with a few other things I needed to wrap up, more about those things later. For now I put together the site, check it out @ http://adron.me. I also put together a video of the hack session during various stages of getting the site live.

During the video I also have a few excursions away form the code to help stay focused on the code. At one point I’m actually working on the Junction App too. Also, keep an eye on it and you can see my Sublime 2 usage, iMac, Lenovo Carbon X1, Ubuntu and a whole slew of other tech. More on all those things too, for now… here’s the video.

…and yeah, no real code complexities or such, mostly an excuse to make a video to some oddball dubstep from the scraps of video I put together during building http://adron.me. Hope it was entertaining, cheers – Adron.

Conference Recap – The awe inspiring quality & number of conferences in Cascadia!

Rails 2013 Conf (April 29th-May 1st)

The Rails 2013 Conference kicked off for me, with a short bike ride through town to the conference center. The Portland conference center is one of the most connected conference centers I’ve seen; light rail, streetcar, bus, bicycle boulevards, trails & of course pedestrian access is all available. I personally have no idea if you can drive to it, but I hear there is parking & such for drivers.

Streetcars

Streetcars

Rails Conf however clearly places itself in the category of a conference of people that give a shit! This is evident in so many things among the community, from the inclusive nature creating one of the most diverse groups of developers to the fact they handed out 7 day transit passes upon picking up your Rails Conf Pass!

Bikes!

Bikes!

The keynote was by DHH (obviously right?). He laid out where the Rails stack is, some roadmap topics & drew out how much the community had grown. Overall, Rails is now in the state of maintain and grow the ideal. Considering its inclusive nature I hope to see it continue to grow and to increase options out there for people getting into software development.

Railsconf 2013

Railsconf 2013

I also met a number of people while at the conference. One person I ran into again was Travis, who lives out yonder in Jacksonville, Florida and works with Hashrocket. Travis & I, besides the pure metal, have Jacksonville as common stomping ground. Last year I’d met him while the Hash Rocket Crew were in town. We discussed Portland, where to go and how to get there, plus what Hashrocket has been up to in regards to use around Mongo, other databases and how Ruby on Rails was treating them. The conclusion, all good on the dev front!

One of these days though, the Hashrocket crew is just gonna have to move to Portland. Sorry Jacksonville, we’ll visit one day. 😉

For the later half of the conferene I actually dove out and headed down for some client discussions in the country of Southern California. Nathan Aschbacher headed up Basho attendance at the conference from this point on. Which reminds me, I’ve gotta get a sitrep with Nathan…

RICON East (May 13th & 14th)

RICON East

RICON East

Ok, so I didn’t actually attend RICON East (sad face), I had far too many things to handle over here in Portlandia – but I watched over 1/3rd of the talks via the 1080p live stream. The basic idea of the RICON Conferences, is a conference series focused on distributed systems. Riak is of course a distributed database, falling into that category, but RICON is by no means merely about Riak at all. At RICON the talks range from competing products to acedemic heavy hitting talks about how, where and why distributed systems are the future of computing. They may touch on things you may be familiar with such as;

  • PaaS (Platform as a Service)
  • Existing databases and how they may fit into the fabric of distributed systems (such as Postgresql)
  • How to scale distributed across AWS Cloud Services, Azure or other cloud providers
RICON East

RICON East

As the videos are posted online I’ll be providing some blog entries around the talks. It will however be extremely difficult to choose the first to review, just as RICON back in October of 2012, every single talk was far above the modicum of the median!

Two immediate two talks that stand out was Christopher Meiklejohn’s @cmeik talk, doing a bit o’ proofs and all, in realtime off the cuff and all. It was merely a 5 minute lightnight talk, but holy shit this guy can roll through and hand off intelligence via a talk so fast in blew my mind!

The other talk was Kyle’s, AKA @aphry, who went through network partitions with databases. Basically destroying any comfort you might have with your database being effective at getting reads in a partition event. Kyle knows his stuff, that is without doubt.

There are many others, so subscribe keep reading and I’ll be posting them in the coming weeks.

Node PDX 2013 (May 16th & 17th)

Horse_js and other characters, planning some JavaScript hacking!

Horse_js and other characters, planning some JavaScript hacking!

Holy moley we did it, again! Thanks to EVERYBODY out there in the community for helping us pull together another kick ass Node PDX event! That’s two years in a row now! My fellow cohort of Troy Howard @thoward37 and Luc Perkins @lucperkins had hustled like some crazed worker bees to get everything together and ready – as always a lot always comes together the last minute and we don’t get a wink of sleep until its all done and everybody has had a good time!

Node PDX Sticker Selection was WICKED COOL!

Node PDX Sticker Selection was WICKED COOL!

Node PDX, it’s pretty self descriptive. It’s a one Node.js conference that also includes topics on hardware, javascript on the client side and a host of other topics. It’s also Portland specific. We have Portland Local Roasted Coffee (thanks Ristretto for the pour over & Coava for the custom roast!), Portland Beer (thanks brew capital of the world!), Portland Food (thanks Nicolas’!), Portland DJs (thanks Monika Mhz!), Portland Bands and tons of Portland wierdness all over the place. It’s always a good time! We get the notion at Node PDX, with all the Portlandia spread all over it’s one of the reasons that 8-12 people move to and get hired in Portland after this conference every year (it might become a larger range, as there are a few people planning to make the move in the coming months!).

A wide angle view of Holocene where Node PDX magic happened!

A wide angle view of Holocene where Node PDX magic happened!

The talks this year increased in number, but maintained a solid range of topics. We had a node.js disco talk, client side JavaScript, sensors and node.js, and even heard about people’s personal stories of how they got into programming JavaScript. Excellent talks, and as with RICON, I’ll be posting a blog entry and adding a few penny thoughts of my own to each talk.

Polyglot Conference 2013 (May 24th Workshops, 25th Conference)

Tea & Chris kick off Polyglot Conference 2013!

Tea & Chris kick off Polyglot Conference 2013!

A smiling crowd!

A smiling crowd!

Polyglot Conference was held in Vancouver again this year, with clear intent to expand to Portland and Seattle in the coming year or two. I’m super stoked about this and will definitely be looking to help out – if you’re interested in helping let me know and I’ll get you in contact with the entire crew that’s been handling things so far!

Polyglot Conference itself is a yearly conference held as an open spaces event. The way open space conferences work is described well on Wikipedia were it is referred to as Open Spaces Technology.

The crowds amass to order the chaos of tracks.

The crowds amass to order the chaos of tracks.

The biggest problem with this conference, is that it’s technically only one day. I hope that we can extend it to two days for next year – and hopefully even have the Seattle and Portland branches go with an extended two day itenerary.

A counting system...

A counting system…

This year the break out sessions that that I attended included “Dev Tools”, “How to Be a Better Programmer”, “Go (Language) Noises”, other great sessions and I threw down a session of my own on “Distributed Systems”. Overall, great time and great sessions! I had a blast and am looking forward to next year.

By the way, I’m not sure if I’ve mentioned this at the beginning of this blog entry, but this is only THE BEGINNING OF SUMMER IN CASCADIA! I’ll have more coverage of these events and others coming up, the roadmap includes OS Bridge (where I’m also speaking) and Portland’s notorious OSCON.

Until the next conference, keep hacking on that next bad ass piece of software, cheers!

Write the Docs, Proper Portland Brew, Hack n’ Bike and Polyglot Conference 2013

Blog Entry Index:

I just wrapped up a long weekend of staycation. Monday kicked off Write the Docs this week and today, Tuesday, I’m getting back into the saddle.

Write the Docs

The Write the Docs Conference this week, a two day affair, has kicked off an expanding community around document creation. This conference is about what documentation is, how we create documentation as technical writers, writers, coders and others in the field.

Not only is it about those things it is about how people interact and why documentation is needed in projects. This is one of the things I find interesting, as it seems obvious, but is entirely not obvious because of the battle between good documentation, bad documentation or a complete lack of documentation. The later being the worse situation.

The Bloody War of Documentation!

At this conference it has been identified that the ideal documentation scenario is that building it starts before any software is even built. I do and don’t agree with this, because I know we must avoid BDUF (Big Design Up Front). But we must take this idea, of documentation first, in the appropriate context of how we’re speaking about documentation at the conference. Just as tests & behaviors identified up front, before the creation of the actual implementation is vital to solid, reliable, consistent, testable & high quality production software, good documentation is absolutely necessary.

There are some situations, the exceptions, such as with agencies that create software, in which the software is throwaway. I’m not and don’t think much of the conference is about those types of systems. What we’ve been speaking about at the conference is the systems, or ecosystems, in which software is built, maintained and used for many years. We’re talking about the APIs that are built and then used by dozens, hundreds or thousands of people. Think of Facebook, Github and Twitter. All of these have APIs that thousands upon thousands use everyday. They’re successful in large part, extremely so, because of stellar documentation. In the case of Facebook, there’s some love and hate to go around because they’ve gone between good documentation and bad documentation. However whenever it has been reliable, developers move forward with these APIs and have built billion dollar empires that employ hundreds of people and benefit thousands of people beyond that.

As developers that have been speaking at the conference, and developers in the audience, and this developer too all tend to agree, build that README file before you build a single other thing within the project. Keep that README updated, keep it marked up and easy to read, and make sure people know what your intent is as best you can. Simply put, document!

You might also have snarkily asked, does Write the Docs have docs,why yes, it does:

http://docs.writethedocs.org/ <- Give em’ a read, they’re solid docs.

Portland Proper Brew

Today while using my iPhone, catching up on news & events over the time I had my staycation I took a photo. On that photo I used Stitch to put together some arrows. Kind of a Portland Proper Brew (PPB) with documentation. (see what I did there!) It exemplifies a great way to start the day.

Everyday I bike (or ride the train or bus) in to downtown Porltand anywhere from 5-9 kilometers and swing into Barista on 3rd. Barista is one of the finest coffee shops, in Portland & the world. If you don’t believe me, drag your butt up here and check it out. Absolutely stellar baristas, the best coffee (Coava, Ritual, Sightglass, Stumptown & others), and pretty sweet digs to get going in the morning.

I’ll have more information on a new project I’ve kicked off. Right now it’s called Bike n’ Hack, which will be a scavenger style code hacking & bicycle riding urban awesome game. If you’re interested in hearing more about this, the project, the game & how everything will work be sure to contact me via twitter @adron or jump into the bike n’ hack github organization and the team will be adding more information about who, what, where, when and why this project is going to be a blast!

Polyglot Conference & the Zombie Apocalypse

I’ll be teaching a tutorial, “Introduction to Distributed Databases” at Polyglot Conference in Vancouver in May!  So it has begun & I’m here for you! Come and check out how to get a Riak deployment running in your survival bunker’s data center. Zombies or just your pointy hair boss scenarios of apocalypse we’ll discuss how consistent hashing, hinted handoff and gossipping can help your systems survive infestations! Here’s a basic outline of what I’ll cover…

Introducing Riak, a database designed to survive the Zombie Plague. Riak Architecture & 5 Minute History of Riak & Zombies.

Architecture deep dive:

  • Consistent Hashing, managing to track changes when your kill zone is littered with Zombies.
  • Intelligent Replication, managing your data against each of your bunkers.
  • Data Re-distribution, sometimes they overtake a bunker, how your data is re-distributed.
  • Short Erlang Introduction, a language fit for managing post-civil society.
  • Getting Erlang

Installing Riak on…

  • Ubuntu, RHEL & the Linux Variety.
  • OS-X, the only user centered computers to survive the apocolypse.
  • From source, maintained and modernized for humanities survival.
  • Upgrading Riak, when a bunker is retaken from the zomibes, it’s time to update your Riak.
  • Setting up

Devrel – A developer’s machine w/ Riak – how to manage without zombie bunkers.

  • 5 nodes, a basic cluster
  • Operating Riak
  • Starting, stopping, and restarting
  • Scaling up & out
  • Managing uptime & data integrity
  • Accessing & writing data

Polyglot client libraries

  • JavaScript/Node.js & Erlang for the zombie curing mad scientists.
  • C#/.NET & Java for the zombie creating corporations.
  • Others, for those trying to just survive the zombie apocolypse.

If you haven’t registered for the Polyglot Conference yet, get registered ASAP as it could sell out!

Some of the other tutorials that are happening, that I wish I could clone myself for…

That’s it for updates right now, more code & news later. Cheers!

My Year of Coding, Messaging, Learning, Leading, Reconoitering, and Hacking in Photos

Hope you have a little patience, this blog entry is going to be pretty long. There was a multitude of conferences, more than a hundred pair coding sessions, more cities, hotels and other things as I criss crossed the country helping to knock out projects, code, fire off some open source projects and generally get some technology implemented. It has been a spectacular year. I also could add, it has thoroughly kicked my ass and I’ve loved it.

2012 Coding Projects

In 2012 I’ve taken the healm of the Iron Foundry Project which led to the creation of Tier 3 Web Fabric PaaS. A Cloud Foundry & Iron Foundry .NET based PaaS. From there the project led to an expansion of leading the efforts on the Thor Project, which is a Cloud Foundry User Interface for OS-X and Windows 7. Beyond that I’ve contributed to and participated in dozens of different projects in various ways over the year. I finished up this year by joining Basho in December and thus, joined the Riak & related Basho Projects.

Coding Project Aims For 2013

Some of the projects I’ve started, will join or hope to otherwise continue participation in include the following. Here’s to hoping 2013 is a hard core coding and contributing year of excellence!

  • Many of the Basho Organization’s Projects I’ll be diving into, including work around Rebar, Riak, Docs & a number of others.
  • Name Factory – a project I’ve started a while back of Riak + JavaScript around creating massive test data with JavaScript and also using Riak for the storage & searching on that data created.
  • Criollo – Criollo is one of the most common forms of cocoa, is a native OS-X Cocoa User Interface for distributed systems built on or using Riak.
  • SpikeOp – This I’ve dubbed the name of the iOS interface for distributed systems built on or using Riak.
  • I want to use and possibly contribute to Corrugated Iron, the .NET Client for Riak. Prospectively to use for a Windows 8 User Interface for distributed systems built on or using Riak.
  • I’ll continue to maintain and provide support for the Iron Foundry vcap-client Library currently available via Nuget for .NET.
  • Thor Project for Cocoa & Thor .NET for Cloud Foundry & Iron Foundry.
  • Expand on prospective services for Cloud Foundry, either I or efforts I may lead to do this.

…there are others, but they’ll have to be figured out during the course of events. Also, there are an easy dozen other projects I’ll be working that don’t particularly have to do with coding, two are listed below. For an easy way to keep up with the projects I’m coding on, leading, participating in or otherwise hit me up on Twitter @adron or ADN @adron.

Big Project Aims for 2013

Thrashing Code Project – This is sort of, kind of secret. It’s going to happen soon, I have a personal schedule for it and I’ll be releasing information accordingly when the site and twitter account goes live.

Tour Triumvirate – I intend to plan, and hopefully will take at least 2 of the three tech tours I setup. More information will be forthcoming, but the original notion is outlined in the blog entry I wrote titled “The Adron Code Tour, Let’s Hack, Bike and Talk Hard Core Technology“.

Books I’ve Read in 2012

All of these I’ve either read or re-read in 2012. I set a goal at the beginning of last year to get my ass in gear when it comes to reading. A focused, get it read, understood and learn approach. I think I did pretty good overall. Not a book a week, but I’m getting back in gear. Considering my best year of reading was 100+ books, it might be a difficult to reach that again since I’m a working citizen, versus a child with plenty of time on their hands. But, it’s good to have goals.  😉

  • The Clean Coder: A Code of Conduct for Professional Programmers
  • The Rails 3 Way
  • Eloquent Ruby
  • The Economics of Freedom: What Your Professors Won’t Tell You, Selected Works of Frederic Bastiat
  • The Myth of the Robber Barons
  • Excellence Without a Soul: Does Liberal Education Have a Future?
  • Seven Databases in Seven Weeks: A Guide to Modern Databases and the NoSQL Movement
  • Surely You’re Joking, Mr. Feynman!
  • The Innovator’s Dilemma: The Revolutionary Book That Will Change the Way You Do Business
  • The Lean Startup: How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses
  • 8 Things We Hate About IT: How to Move Beyond the Frustrations to Form a New Partnership with IT
  • Smart and Gets Things Done: Joel Spolsky’s Concise Guide to Finding the Best Technical Talent
  • Rework
  • Steve Jobs
  • Eloquent JavaScript: A Modern Introduction to Programming
  • JavaScript: The Good Parts
  • Node for Front-End Developers
  • First Contact (In Her Name: The Last War, #1)
  • Cloudonomics: The Business Value of Cloud Computing
  • The REST API Design Handbook
  • HTML5 Canvas
  • HTML5: Up and Running
  • Triumph of the City: How Our Greatest Invention Makes Us Richer, Smarter, Greener, Healthier, and Happier
  • Traffic

Book Reading Aims for 2013

  • Natural Capitalism
  • How God Changes Your Brain: Breakthrough Findings from a Leading Neuroscientist
  • Discourse on the Method of Rightly Conducting One’s Reason and of Seeking Truth in the Sciences
  • Political Ideals
  • The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin
  • Wrestling with Moses: How Jane Jacobs Took On New York’s Master Builder and Transformed the American City
  • Bikenomics: An Introduction to the Bicycle Economy
  • Everyday Bicycling: How to Ride a Bike for Transportation (Whatever Your Lifestyle)
  • Just Ride: A Radically Practical Guide to Riding Your Bike
  • Continuous Delivery: Reliable Software Releases through Build, Test, and Deployment Automation
  • Erlang Programming
  • Building Web Applications with Erlang: Working with REST and Web Sockets on Yaws
  • Think Complexity: Complexity Science and Computational Modeling
  • Async JavaScript
  • Smashing Node.js: JavaScript Everywhere (Smashing Magazine Book Series)
  • Windows PowerShell for Developers
  • How to Use the Unix-Linux vi Text Editor
  • Sketching User Experiences: The Workbook
  • Designing Interfaces
  • Information Architecture for the World Wide Web: Designing Large-Scale Web Sites
  • Consider Phlebas
  • Snow Crash
  • How to Change the World: Social Entrepreneurs and the Power of New Ideas
  • Mission, Inc.: The Practitioner’s Guide to Social Enterprise
  • Simply Complexity
  • Complex Adaptive Systems: An Introduction to Computational Models of Social Life (Princeton Studies in Complexity)
  • Thinking In Systems: A Primer
  • Thinking, Fast and Slow
  • Programming in Objective-C
  • Learning iPad Programming: A Hands-on Guide to Building iPad Apps with iOS 5
  • Cocoa Programming for Mac OS X
  • Getting Started with GEO, CouchDB, and Node.js
  • JavaScript Web Applications
  • Suburban Nation: The Rise of Sprawl and the Decline of the American Dream
  • Design Patterns in Ruby

…and the two books I’d like to re-read this year because they’re just absurdly entertaining and I’d like a refresher of the stories.

  • A Confederacy of Dunces (I’ll be reading this for the 2nd time)
  • The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy (Yup, just want to read it again)

My 2012 Coder’s Year in Photos

What I’ve put together here is a photo story of the year, hopefully it’s entertaining in some way. With that, here’s a review of the year, cheers and happy new year! 2012 started with one of my last hack sessions as a Seattle Resident at Ruby at Racer weekly meetup.

Ruby at Racer Meetup

Ruby at Racer Meetup

Meanwhile some of my last views from Russell Investments. Absolutely beautiful, epic and awe inspiring views of the Puget Sound from the Emerald City of Seattle.

View from Russell Investments Seattle Headquarters, stunning!

View from Russell Investments Seattle Headquarters, stunning!

Then a fitting image, from the business meeting floor of the same building, the settings sun for my departure.

Overlooking the Puget Sound, Japanese Garden in the forefront from the Russell Investments Building in Seattle.

Overlooking the Puget Sound, Japanese Garden in the forefront from the Russell Investments Building in Seattle.

February of 2012 kicked of with my return to Portland, Oregon. Stumptown regularly welcomed me back more than a few moments.

Stumptown Morning Brew

Stumptown Morning Brew

One of the first meetups I attended back in Portland was the DevOps Meetup.

DevOps DevOpers Hanging around pre-meeting at PuppetLabs in Portland.

DevOps DevOpers Hanging around pre-meeting at PuppetLabs in Portland.

That DevOps meetup just happened to have a session on one of the code bases I was working with, Cloud Foundry.

Cloud Foundry preso on how the pull requests and such where going to be built into a process, which still today is rather cumbersome for community involvement. However, it's still moving forward, albeit at a slower pace than it could if it was streamlined around github instead of github being an

Cloud Foundry preso on how the pull requests and such where going to be built into a process, which still today is rather cumbersome for community involvement. However, it’s still moving forward, albeit at a slower pace than it could if it was streamlined around github instead of github being an “end point” read only repository…

While my move consisted of many a couch, as I just couch surfed for the first 45 or so days I was back in Portland, I finally moved into a place at the Indigo in downtown.

My New Place, priorities as they are my system sits in the corner ready for use.

My New Place, priorities as they are my system sits in the corner ready for use.

The new system, albeit a great Christmas present from 2011, became the defacto work system of 2012 and remains one of my top machines. Mac Book Air w/ 4GB RAM, i5 Proc, 256 GB SSD. Not a bad machine.

2011 Mac Book Air, settled into it's workspace cradle.

2011 Mac Book Air, settled into it’s workspace cradle.

A view from on high, looking down upon the streets of San Francisco from the New Relic Offices. Thanks for the invite and the visit, it was great meeting the great team at New Relic San Francisco!

New Relic San Francisco View

New Relic San Francisco View

Getting around on my first trip to San Francisco of 2012. Thanks to John, Bjorn, Bill, John and the whole team in Portland and San Francisco for the invite. Great talking to you guys.

MUNI Streetcar FTW!

MUNI Streetcar FTW!

On the same trip it began pouring rain as I’d never seen before in San Francisco. I sat by Duboche Park, staying warm and away from drowning! Arriving outside was one of the MUNIs that eventually I was rescued by from the torrential floods and returned to downtown, dry and intact!

MUNI to the rescue on the torrential downpour of the year in San Francisco.

MUNI to the rescue on the torrential downpour of the year in San Francisco.

…and Julia thanks for the tour around San Francisco and the extra tasty lunch at EAT!! Good times!

Eating at the EAT sign!

Eating at the EAT sign!

Amidst all these images, I threw together some into a collage. There are a number of awesome coders & hackers of all sorts in these images. Shout out to Jerry Sievert, Eric Sterling,

Snikies, a collage I made!!!! (This one you can click on for a full size image)

Snikies, a collage I made!!!! (This one you can click on for a full size image)

…and alas I’ll have another zillion images and such as we all roll into 2013 and onward. Cheers! For some more new years posts I’ve found useful check out this list, which I’ll be adding to over the next few days.