__2 “Starting a Basic Loopback API & Continuous Integration”

In this article Keartida is going to dive into setting up a basic Loopback API project and get a build of that project running on a continuous integration service. In this example she’s going to get the project setup with Codeship.

Prerequisites:

  • Be sure, whichever system you are using, to have a C++ compiler installed. For Windows that usually means installing Visual Studio or something, on OS-X install XCode and the Developer Tools. On Ubuntu the GCC compiler and other options exist. For instructions on OS-X and Linux check out installing compiler tools.
  • Ubuntu
  • OS-X
  • For windows, I’d highly suggest setting up a VM of Ubuntu to do any work with Loopback, Node.js, or follow along with this material. It’s possible on Windows, but there are a number of things that are lacking. If you still want to make a go of using Windows, here are some initial setup steps here.

Nice to Haves:

  • git-flow – works on any bash, handles the branching and merging. Very nice scripts to have.
  • bashit – Adding more information to the bash prompt (works on OS-X, not Ubuntu or Windows Bash)

Continue reading “__2 “Starting a Basic Loopback API & Continuous Integration””

__1 “Getting Started, Kanban & First Steps for a Sharing App”

This is the first (of course the precursor to this entry was the zero day team introduction article) of an ongoing series I’m going to put together. I’m going to write this series from the context of a team building a product. I’ll have code samples and more as I work along through the material.

The first step included Oi Elffaw having a discussion with the team to setup the first week’s working effort. Oi decided to call it a sprint and the rest of the team decided that was cool too. This was week one after all and there wasn’t going to be much else besides testing, research, and setup that took place.

Prerequisites

Before starting everything I went ahead and created a project repository on github for Oi to use waffle.io with. Waffle.io is an online service that works with github issues to provide a kanban style inferface to the issues. This provides an easier view, especially for leads and management, to get insight into where things are and what’s on the plate for the team for the week. I included the default node.js .gitignore file and an Apache 2.0 license when I created the repository. Github then seeds the project with a .gitignore, README.md and the license files.

After setting up the repository in github I pinged Oi and he set to work after the team’s initial meet to discuss what week one would include. Continue reading “__1 “Getting Started, Kanban & First Steps for a Sharing App””

My Train of Thought on JavaScript, Web Analytics, & Segment

Beware, this is my brain dump as I attempt to figure out Segment integrations. It might seem disconnected at first but I’ll make every effort to loop things back around. First a few pieces of context, or more simply my goals for this blog entry:

1. My goal here is to implement a server side integration with Segment that allows for data, which flows through their system, to end up in another system.

2. The term, it appears, for the software one would build and deploy to their system for them to feed data into another system is called an integration. There is a long list of the integrations that they have available today. It’s so long, that Segment actually has a search feature and all of the integrations divided into sub groups of integrations by advertising, analytics, marketing, sales, support, developer, and user testing.

Continue reading “My Train of Thought on JavaScript, Web Analytics, & Segment”

I’m so mad!!! My response to the fork of node.js to io.js!

I’m so mad!!!

No, actually I’m not. This is cool.

It’s so confusing! No, it’s actually not. Use your learnings and read this Node Forward and read Max’s @maxogdenWhat you need to know.” gist.

It’ll be so hard to test this and test with node.js. Not really, again, read the threads there are a million different ways that you’ll be able to setup a clean build against either while keeping both around on your dev machine. Again, repeating myself, this is cool.

Summary for Devs: This is cool. It’s not going to wreck your projects. Just read up on it and it’ll all be a most excellent journey.

Summary for Decision Makers: Read @eranhammer‘s blog post here. TLDR; is, don’t second guess your decision to go with Node.js, don’t flip out about a Node.js or io.js investment, this isn’t anything more than a healthy ecosystem at work. It’ll be cool.